Even the Worst Things Come to an End

By Kalengule Kaoma

Recently I visited Nairobi, the capital city of Kenya, and spoke to a number of people about what happened in late 2007 and early 2008 when the country endured disgraceful violence that dampened the spirits, hopes, and aspirations of much of the population. Many people lost their properties. Others were severely injured and many lost loved ones.

Despite the prevailing despair, I noticed something wonderful in several of the citizens I spoke to. They agreed that while they faced severe challenges, problems, difficulties, hardships and trials, they were determined to find lasting solutions.

The coastal people of Kenya have a saying: “Mbio za sakafuni huishia ukingoni,” The translation is, “A race to the sea will end at the seashore,” and the idea behind it is that even the worst things eventually come to an end.

Other people have experienced very hard times. One of them, an ancient author, Paul of Tarsus, wrote:

“We do not want you to be uninformed, brothers, about the hardships we suffered in the province of Asia. We were under great pressure, far beyond our ability to endure, so that we despaired even of life. Indeed, in our hearts we felt the sentence of death. But this happened that we might not rely on ourselves but on God, who raises the dead. He has delivered us from such a deadly peril, and he will deliver us. On him we have set our hope that he will continue to deliver us.”

At the end of every dark night will finally come the dawn. Kenyans who confidently say, “Mbio za sakafuni huishia ukingoni!” know that, no matter how bad things may seem, there is always hope.

copyright 2008

Kalengule Kaoma lives in Zambia, Africa, and is a mission developer for a number of African nations.

Print Share This Page:
Facebook Twitter Google+ Tumblr WordPress Blogger