References to: 1 Corinthians

The Resurrection (1 Cor. 15:1-11)

Dan Rogers and Small Group

The Resurrection (1 Cor. 15:1-11)

Dan Rogers leads a house church in discussion about the Resurrection of Jesus. Leading small church groups in discussion format can be a fresh and engaging ministry approach.

(32.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Dan Rogers

Dan Rogers earned his PhD in historical theology from Union Institute and University. He is now retired, after serving many years as the Director of Church Administration & Development in Grace Communion International.

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Dan Rogers: Good morning everyone. Good to see you here once again and as usual, it’s time now in our service to talk about God’s word. Our text for today is going to be from 1 Corinthians 15. Before we get to the text, let’s talk a little about the background in which Paul is writing to them, to the church in the city of Corinth. Anybody know anything of interest about the city of Corinth that you’d like to share with the rest of us? What do you know about that town in ancient Greece?

Person: It was a very well-known town in that area. It was important as far as commerce.

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One at a Time, Please: A Study of 1 Corinthians 14:26-39

What did first-century believers do in their worship meetings? The Bible gives us only a few glimpses into the details. Paul gives a description in 1 Corinthians 14:26: “When you come together, each of you has a hymn, or a word of instruction, a revelation, a tongue or an interpretation.” Every believer had a part to play, each according to the way that God had gifted them.

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Are You Out of Your Mind? A Study of 1 Corinthians 14:13-25

The believers in Corinth liked to speak in tongues, but Paul encouraged them to focus instead on gifts that build up the church. He explains why the gift of prophesying is better than tongues for use in church meetings.

Does anyone understand? (verses 13-17)

Believers meet together in order to build one another up (v. 26). But tongues are of private value; they do not help others. So Paul exhorts, “the one who speaks in a tongue should pray that they may interpret what they say.” If they speak in tongues, they should desire that their words be explained.

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The Greatest Thing

Joseph Tkach

The Greatest Thing

Thieves can steal your possessions, disease can destroy your body, but "the greatest thing" is indestructible. We even take it with us when we die.

(3.6 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

See a Bible study on 1 Corinthians 13.

Have you ever thought about the fact that the only thing in the world that really matters is love? It’s the only thing that lasts, the only thing that makes us whole, that fills us, that soothes us, that completes us.

Paul describes love in 1 Corinthians 13. He wrote:

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The Most Excellent Way: 1 Corinthians 13

The church in first-century Corinth was plagued with social divisions and rivalries. Paul explained to them that God gives different people different abilities—not so that some people can exalt themselves over others, but so that everyone will work together for the common good (1 Cor. 12:7). No one is self-sufficient, and no one is unnecessary.

Near the end of chapter 12, he again explains that God appoints different roles in the church. He asks, Is everyone in the church an apostle? Of course not, he implies. It’s silly to expect everyone to have the same role (vv. 28-30).

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The Gift of Prophecy: A Study of 1 Corinthians 14:1-12

The early Christians in Corinth were fascinated with spiritual gifts. After telling them to “desire the greater gifts” (12:31), Paul described to them “the most excellent way”—love (13:1-13). Paul then weighed the relative merits of two spiritual gifts—one the Corinthians had over-valued, and one that they did not value enough. This problem warranted considerable space in Paul’s letter.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Diversity and Unity in Spiritual Gifts: 1 Corinthians 12

The church members in Corinth asked Paul a number of questions, and Paul responded in the letter we know as 1 Corinthians. One of the topics he addresses is “spiritual gifts.” Paul’s explanation begins in chapter 12; we’ll begin in verse 3.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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The Resurrection Body - 1 Corinthians 15b

Ancient Greek philosophers believed that the world of spirit is perfect, whereas the world of matter is bad. The human soul is good, but it is trapped in the physical world. The body is a like a tomb, and the soul needs to escape.

These beliefs affected the congregation in Corinth. Some church members thought that the body is bad, so they denied all bodily pleasures, even in marriage. Others went to the opposite extreme: since the body will eventually be discarded, it doesn’t matter what a person does in the body.

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Will We Live Again? 1 Corinthians 15a

Every spring, Easter reminds Christians that Jesus rose from the dead. His resurrection was certainly good news for him, and we rejoice that our Friend lives again. But Easter tells us more than that — it tells us something about our life, too.

A core component of the gospel

Paul wrote his letter to the church at Corinth to address several problems and questions that the members had. In chapter 15, he responds to the idea that no one will be resurrected from the dead.

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Exegetical Notes on 1 Corinthians 12

Features of the literary structure

Paul writes, I don’t want you to be ignorant about the spiritual things (v.1). This is similar to 7:1, so Paul may be addressing the topic of spiritual things at the request of the Corinthians. Fee notes that "this is a nearly universal conviction (570n), but notes that Paul’s corrective comments imply that the Corinthians were not simply asking for information. I suspect that they did not admit any ignorance about this topic, so 12:1b may indicate that Paul is initiating the topic (cf. 11:18).

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