References to: Acts 1-8

Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 8

The Church Expands Into Judea, Galilee and Samaria (Acts 8)

A young man named Saul (8:1)

Luke next introduces the man who will soon become the main character of Acts. He is Saul, later called by his Latin name Paul. (We will call him “Paul” from here on out.) Paul was born in Tarsus, a city in eastern Asia Minor (21:39).

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Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 7

Acts Chapter 7: Persecution Strikes the Church, part 3

Stephen’s speech before the Sanhedrin (7:2-53)

Stephen’s response is the longest speech in Acts. His speech can be divided into segments that cover different aspects of Israel’s history:

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Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 6

Persecution Strikes the Church, continued

Hebraic and Grecian Jews (6:1)

Luke turns away from the conflict between the Sanhedrin and the church leaders to introduce two groups within the Jerusalem church. They were the “Grecian” Jews (Greek, Hellenistai, or “Hellenists”) and “Hebraic” Jews. We may be surprised that subgroups exist within the first church. But these groups are crucial to the story of Acts.

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Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 5

The Jerusalem Church, continued

Ananias and Sapphira (5:1)

In chapter 4, Luke painted an idealistic portrait of the Jerusalem church as a congregation of faithful (4:23-31) and loving (4:32-35) believers. He cited the example of Barnabas, who epitomized both the love and faith of this congregation (4:36-37). But Luke wants to give his readers a more complete view of the situation in the church. In the beginning of chapter 5 Luke provides an example that showed the church to be less-than-perfect.

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Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 3

The Jerusalem Ministry of Peter and John
ACTS 3:1-4:22

Peter and John (3:1)

Acts 3 describes the dramatic healing of a beggar. How soon after Pentecost this occurred is not clear. Days, weeks or months may have elapsed. The story begins with the indefinite, “One day…” This chapter describes the preaching of the gospel in Jerusalem (specifically, at the temple) by Peter and John, two of the church’s leaders. What Luke wrote is important because it shows us how the apostles preached the gospel.

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Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 2

The Day of Pentecost (2:1)

The day called “Pentecost” is named after the Greek word pentekostos, which means “fiftieth.” It was the only Old Testament festival determined by counting. On the day after the Sabbath after Passover, the ancient Israelites selected a sheaf of the first grain that had been harvested in the spring. This grain became an offering, and the priest waved it “before the Lord” (Leviticus 23:11-12). Pentecost was observed in ancient Israel on the 50th day after this (verse 15).

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Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 1

The Dedications of Luke and Acts (Luke 1:1-4; Acts 1:1-2)

Luke began his book, which we call the “Acts of the Apostles” or simply “Acts,” by continuing his story where he ended it in the Gospel. Luke’s Gospel had described Jesus’ work in Galilee, Judea and especially Jerusalem. It ended, as did the other three Gospels, with Jesus’ death and resurrection.

Acts continues the story. It describes the growth of the church and the spread of the gospel from Jerusalem to important cities of the Roman Empire, and then Rome itself.

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Preaching in the Book of Acts Part 1: Peter

The church today is a continuation of first-century Christianity. We do not imitate every cultural detail of the church, but we do want to continue the faith and the message of the early church. To help us do this, let’s turn to a record of what they did: the book of Acts. Evangelism is a major theme of the book. Let’s examine it to see what the apostles preached.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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The Acts of the Apostles

sailing ship. Artwork by Ken TunellThis book is commonly called "The Acts of the Apostles," but it does not discuss most of the apostles - it focuses only on Peter, and then Paul. The book describes the spread of Christianity from its origins with Jews in Jerusalem, to eventually include all peoples, even in the capital city of the Roman Empire. The story is filled with drama, miracles, and speeches about the risen Christ.

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