References to: Acts 17-28

Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 28

Safety on Malta (Acts 28:1-2)

Everyone either swam to the island or rode in on debris, and safely reached shore (27:43-44). After a harrowing journey, the passengers and crew could enjoy the safe haven of their landing site, the island of Malta. The Maltese rallied around the victims of this ship disaster much as people lend a hand to those suffering from disasters everywhere. In the words of Luke, they showed an “unusual kindness” (28:2).

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this part of the Bible: 

Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 27

Paul sails for Rome (Acts 27:1-28:15)

Luke as eyewitness (Acts 27:1)

Sometime after Paul’s meeting with Agrippa, Festus made arrangements for Paul to be taken to Rome. Luke wrote: “When it was decided that we would sail for Italy, Paul and some other prisoners were handed over to a centurion named Julius” (27:1). Luke resumed the “we” narrative section, which he had broken off when Paul and the delegation met with James in Jerusalem (21:18). The present “we” section continues until Paul reaches Rome (28:16). This is the longest of the four “we” panels.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this part of the Bible: 

Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 26

Agrippa opens the inquest (Acts 26:1)

Though Luke described Paul’s speech as a “defense,” the occasion was a fact-finding investigation rather than a formal judicial inquiry (26:1). That is why Festus allowed Agrippa to preside at the meeting, for it was Agrippa who told Paul, “You have permission to speak for yourself” (26:1).

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this part of the Bible: 

Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 25

Festus goes to Jerusalem (Acts 25:1-3)

As a new governor, Festus needed to become familiar with the local authorities. Three days after arriving in Judea, he went to Jerusalem to meet with the Jewish leaders. This was a dangerous time for Paul. The religious leaders would see the change in procurators as an opportunity to take advantage of a new and inexperienced governor. (In a similar situation a few years later, James would be killed by the high priest after Festus died and before the next governor arrived to take the reins of office.)

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this part of the Bible: 

Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 24

Paul the Prisoner of Rome, continued

Jews bring charges (Acts 24:1-4)

Five days after Paul arrived in Caesarea, the Jewish prosecuting team arrived to state their charges against him (24:1). It was composed of the high priest Ananias, some of the Jewish elders, and a special legal counselor named Tertullus. Tertullus was a common Greek name, and he was probably a Hellenistic Jew chosen because of his expertise in Roman law and his skill in public speaking. The Sanhedrin was taking no chances on letting Paul slip through its grasp.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this part of the Bible: 

Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 17

The gospel goes into Macedonia and Greece

On to Thessalonica (17:1)

After Paul, Silas and Timothy leave Philippi, they travel west through the next two towns — Amphipolis and Apollonia. If any missionary work occurs there, Luke has no interest in telling his readers about it. Luke simply says that Paul and his company go through these towns. Amphipolis is about 33 miles (53 kilometers) southwest of Philippi, along the Via Egnatia. Apollonia is 27 miles (43 kilometers) west-southwest of Amphipolis.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this part of the Bible: 

In the Steps of the Apostle Paul

The message of salvation Paul carried to Europe 2,000 years ago can give us new hope for the future.

About A.D. 50 a spiritual crusade began in Greece that dramatically changed the tide of history. The apostle Paul landed on the European continent, armed with the gospel message given him by Jesus Christ. This project was so important in God’s purpose that he miraculously led Paul to Europe to teach the message of salvation, beginning in Macedonian Greece.

By: 

Paul Kroll and Ronald Kelly
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Other articles about this part of the Bible: 

The Acts of the Apostles

sailing ship. Artwork by Ken TunellThis book is commonly called "The Acts of the Apostles," but it does not discuss most of the apostles - it focuses only on Peter, and then Paul. The book describes the spread of Christianity from its origins with Jews in Jerusalem, to eventually include all peoples, even in the capital city of the Roman Empire. The story is filled with drama, miracles, and speeches about the risen Christ.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this part of the Bible: