References to: Galatians

David Torrance: Not I, But Christ

Rev. David Torrance

David Torrance: Not I, But Christ

Rev. David Torrance explains what it means to receive Christ: that we share in his death and his resurrection -- death to our old life of sin, and a new life in Christ.

(29.0 minutes)
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Biography:
David Torrance

David Torrance served for 36 years in parish ministry in the Church of Scotland; he is the brother of theologians Thomas and James Torrance. He helped edit the English edition of Calvin's New Testament commentaries, and is a co-author of A Passion for Christ: Vision That Ignites Ministry. His website is at www.livebyfaith.org.uk. For a transcript of all five YI interviews, click here.

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For an edited transcript of our interviews with David Torrance, click here.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Why do you think translators “alter” the Greek prepositions in verses such as Galatians 2:20?

2. Please share your thoughts on the statement, “Salvation is entirely of God and not of us.”

3. What is your perception of Christ as our response to God?

4. How do you understand belief as being required of us, but that it is also a gift of grace?

5. What do you think of the assertion that Jesus is the representative human for each of us?

6. Please give us your impressions of our “dying and rising” in Christ.

7. How do you see, “To receive God’s forgiveness means that we must share it with others”?

8. Forgiveness was described as a “gift of God,” “real grace,” and “healing.” Please comment.

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

The faith of Christ

MM: You’ve been a parish minister for many years, and you’ve seen God’s grace being given to people in the parish, and you see how people respond to that with faith. I’d like to ask you about what faith is.

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Do Good to All: A Study of Galatians 6

In many of his letters, Paul concludes with a list of commands. In Galatians, he gives a series of proverbs. He wants his readers to be guided by the Spirit, not a list of laws, so he gives them principles that require some thought.

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Michael Morrison
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The Purpose of Freedom: Galatians 5

Paul has vigorously argued that Christians are not enslaved to sin and not enslaved to law. How then do we live between these two errors?

Circumcision a mark of slavery (verses 1-6)

Paul begins chapter 5 with a bold slogan of spiritual liberty: “It is for freedom that Christ has set us free.” Christ lived, died, and was resurrected so that we might be free.

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Inheritors, Not Slaves: Galatians 4

How can Gentiles inherit the promises God gave to Abraham? Some people said that Gentiles ought to keep the laws of Moses if they want to be part of the covenant people. Paul said no!

Paul ends chapter 3 by saying that Gentiles can inherit the promises of salvation without any need to keep the laws of Moses (Galatians 3:29). In chapter 4, Paul uses two analogies to explain what he means.

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Redeemed from the Curse of the Law: Galatians 3

How could anyone believe it? How could the people taught by Paul himself go so quickly astray into false doctrines? Paul, who had seen many things in his ministry, was flabbergasted. He was astonished that the Christians in Galatia were attracted to a “gospel” that heaped extra requirements on them.

Some people were saying that everyone needed to keep the laws of Moses. Paul wrote a strongly worded letter to stop this nonsense! In chapter 3 Paul explains that Christ died to release us from these obsolete rules.

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Michael Morrison
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Justified by Faith, Not by Law: Galatians 2

Someone had been telling the Galatian Christians false stories about Paul’s relationship with the original apostles and the Jerusalem church. Paul responds by recounting his history — and he uses that story as a launching pad for preaching the gospel of salvation by grace. Chapter 2 includes two important interactions.

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The Gospel Revealed: Galatians 1

Paul started several churches in the province of Galatia and then moved on to other regions. Then he learned that some other people had gone to Galatia and were teaching the people that the gospel involved much more than Paul had told them. “Jesus is good,” they apparently said, “but you need to go further. You need to obey the Law that God gave his people. Faith is good, but you need the laws of Moses, too.”

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