References to: Genesis

Genesis: Isaac and Jacob

Chapters 25:19-36:42

Jacob and Esau: chapter 25:19–34

In the Hebrew culture, a woman’s inability to have children was a reproach. It struck at the core of the Hebrew belief that every family stemming from Abraham was part of the covenant of God. Infertility, a “barren womb,” was embarrassing to a wife and could end a loving relationship. The denial of motherhood was a crushing blow. And few acts of God could be a more direct blessing than the reversal of a woman’s infertility.

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The Faith of Abraham

For an overview of what will be covered in this chapter, read Genesis 1225.

Abraham is without question one of the outstanding individuals of the Old Testament. God spoke to him personally, visited him in his home and even considered him a friend. And Abraham loved God. He obeyed him, served him, and was even willing to sacrifice his son to prove his faith. Abraham is a biblical superhero, richly deserving a place in the Old Testament Hall of Fame. But are his experiences something you can personally relate to?

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The Gathering Storm

The ancient story of Noah building his ark is much more than history. God instructed Noah to build the ark because a crisis was at hand. But the people of Noah’s day saw no such crisis. For them, life would continue with business as usual.

This is the normal attitude of the majority. "In the days before the flood," said Jesus, "people were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage…until the flood came and took them all away" (Matthew 24:38-39).

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Genesis: "In the Beginning..." From Creation to Abraham

“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” (Genesis 1:1). These famous opening words of the Bible express the Hebrew and later the Christian belief about the foundation of the universe. Does the universe have meaning? Genesis tells us that it does. The universe was divinely conceived. Therefore, it can only be fully understood in light of a divine plan.

Here are some of the main things we learn from the creation account:

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Exploring Genesis

What’s in a name?

Genesis is a transliteration of a Greek word meaning “origin,” “beginning” or “generation.” This name was given to the book from the Greek (Septuagint) translation of Genesis 2:4: “haute he biblos geneseos ouranou kai ges,” which means “This is the book of the generations of heaven and earth.”

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