References to: Luke 9-16

Parable of the Lost Son

The parable of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32) is perhaps better named the parable of the lost son, since it is designed to go with the parables of the lost sheep (verses 3-7) and lost coin (verses 8-10). Some have even called it the parable of the prodigal father, because of the father’s extrav­agance. Even today, after centuries of teaching about God’s grace, the father’s willingness to forgive his runaway son is shockingly generous.

This is Jesus’ longest parable: 22 verses. Let’s go through the parable, noting its story, its organization and its lessons.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Lazarus and the Rich Man: A Tale of Unbelief

Have you ever heard that God is incapable of reaching those who do not become believers before they die? It’s a cruel and destructive doctrine, and its so-called “proof” is a single verse in the parable known as Lazarus and the Rich Man. But like all of Scripture, the parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man falls within a particular context and needs to be understood in that context.

By: 

J. Michael Feazell
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Lazarus and the Rich Man, by Paul Kroll

Jesus told the story of Lazarus the beggar and the rich man to illustrate a point about having an authentic relationship with God. Some believe Jesus meant the parable as a satire of the Pharisees’ belief that they were in a privileged position with God. In that context, the parable would be a statement about their love of privilege and wealth.

By: 

Paul Kroll
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Lazarus and the Rich Man, by J. Michael Feazell

Let's look at a passage that is often interpreted as proving that all who die without having come to faith are automatically damned. It is the story of Lazarus and the Rich Man, in which Abraham tells the rich man there is a great gulf fixed that keeps those in Hades separate from those who are with Abraham. It is found in Luke 16:19-31. Before the story begins, however, we can back up a few verses to get an idea of whom Jesus was talking to when he told this story and what was the subject that prompted him to tell it.

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A New Look at the Good Samaritan

The Good Samaritan is one of Jesus’ most popular parables. Preachers often use it to encourage people to be unselfish, to think ahead and help others. But there is more to the story than that. Jesus was doing far more than putting hypocritical religious leaders in their place. Let’s take a closer look.

A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he fell into the hands of robbers. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him and went away, leaving him half dead.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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It's Not What You Have - It's Who Has You

Dan Rogers

It's Not What You Have - It's Who Has You

It's important to know who has you covered.

(16.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Dan Rogers

Dan Rogers earned his PhD in historical theology from Union Institute and University. He is now retired, after serving many years as the Director of Church Administration & Development in Grace Communion International.

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I know I shouldn’t tease my wife, but sometimes I just can’t help it. For example she’ll say, “Dan, what do you want for dinner?” I’ll make up some menus such as maybe some imported sea bass, maybe surf and turf, a little filet mignon to go with that. Maybe a stuffed baked potato, some asparagus spears maybe, a salad with imported Roquefort dressing. How about some baked Alaska for dessert?

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Share God's Love (Jesus and Zacchaeus)

Dan Rogers

Share God's Love (Jesus and Zacchaeus)

Dan Rogers, Share God's Love

(17.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Dan Rogers

Dan Rogers earned his PhD in historical theology from Union Institute and University. He is now retired, after serving many years as the Director of Church Administration & Development in Grace Communion International.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

Hi everyone, I’m here today to tell you that God loves you. Now, if you’re a Christian, you’re probably saying, “Well Dan, I know that God loves me.” I’m glad that you know that God loves you, but you know there are a lot of people out there, including maybe your neighbors and certainly the rest of humanity, that may not yet know that God loves them.

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