References to: Romans 1-8

Douglas Campbell: Understanding the Book of Romans (audio only)

Dr. Douglas Campbell

Douglas Campbell: Understanding the Book of Romans (audio only)

The Book of Romans can be confusing without centering on the core teachings of Romans chapters 5 through 8.

Due to a camera malfunction, we do not have video of this interview.

(27.1 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Douglas Campbell

Dr. Douglas Campbell is Associate Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School in Durham, North Carolina. He is the author of The Quest for Paul's Gospel and The Deliverance of God: An Apocalyptic Rereading of Justification in Paul. For a PDF of all four interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Authentic and valid “right behavior” was linked to our union with Christ. What do you think about that?

2. Dr. Campbell said, “People have just got Paul very, very wrong.” Do you agree? Why or not?

3. It was stressed that Romans 1-4 needs to be read in light of chapters 5-8. Does this help us understand what Paul meant?

4. What do you think of the assertion that judgment has already taken place at the cross?

5. How does fear and misunderstanding of the gospel impact our “joyful assurance” in Christ?

6. How do you understand grace in contrast to “conditional” and “contractual” religion?

7. A misunderstanding of the gospel and Paul was associated with Western culture and politics. Do you see a link here? Why or why not?

8. Why is it critical to make the distinction between unconditional covenant and a contract?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Introduction: Welcome to this unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. Our guest today is Douglas Campbell, Associate Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School. Dr. Campbell is author of The Deliverance of God and The Quest for Paul’s Gospel.

J. Michael Feazell: Thanks for being here.

Douglas Campbell: You’re welcome.

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Douglas Campbell: In Christ - Conversion and Calling

Dr. Douglas Campbell

Douglas Campbell: In Christ - Conversion and Calling

Douglas Campbell looks at examples of how Paul brought the gospel and purpose to the mission field.

(32.0 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Douglas Campbell

Dr. Douglas Campbell is Associate Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School in Durham, North Carolina. He is the author of The Quest for Paul's Gospel and The Deliverance of God: An Apocalyptic Rereading of Justification in Paul. For a PDF of all four interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide
 

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. What do you think of the assertion that Paul was “called” rather than “converted”?

2. “People were converting within the context of relationships they already had.” Your thoughts?

3. Please share your impressions of Paul’s missionary work being described as “networking.”

4. Is evangelizing through nurturing relationships preferable to “preaching” today? If so why?

5. Why were Paul’s high behavioral expectations and strong ethics for the community stressed?

6. Dr. Campbell described Christianity as “participation in a new reality.” What does that mean to you?

7. Paul invested resources and time into keeping relationships alive. How important is this today?

8. Our identity in Christ involves affirmation of our “full personhood.” How important is this to you?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Introduction: Welcome to this unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. Our guest today is Douglas Campbell, Associate Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School. Dr. Campbell is author of The Deliverance of God and The Quest for Paul’s Gospel.

Mike Morrison: Douglas, thanks for being with us.

Douglas Campbell: You’re welcome.

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Other articles about this part of the Bible: 

Douglas Campbell: Our Participation With Christ

Dr. Douglas Campbell

Douglas Campbell: Our Participation With Christ

This interview gets to the heart and core of Paul's gospel. It includes our Reality with a capital "R" plus our participation with Christ and with each other in communion with God.

(30.0 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Douglas Campbell

Dr. Douglas Campbell is Associate Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School in Durham, North Carolina. He is the author of The Quest for Paul's Gospel and The Deliverance of God: An Apocalyptic Rereading of Justification in Paul. For a PDF of all four interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Group Study Guide (also available in pdf format)

Paul’s gospel focuses on “participation.” We have nothing to offer God, but in Christ, God gives us everything. His gifts enable us to participate with Christ through the Holy Spirit in Christ’s own communion with the Father, and therefore with fellow human beings.

Discussion

1. In what ways has the “the end” already come to us through Christ’s resurrection?

2. What is the “New Reality” that Dr. Campbell spoke of?

3. How has Christ taken our sin, depression, dislocation and death onto himself?

4. What does it mean to be “resurrected with Christ”?

5. How has God “come the whole way to you”?

6. How have you participated with Christ by “entering into his suffering”?

7. How do we participate in Christ with God and one another and the world?

8. How does humanity share in the eternal communion of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit?

9. What is the “essential reality” of our relationship with God and with one another?

10. What are some implications of the gospel’s emphasis on relationships being made right in Christ, as opposed the common idea of us trying to find righteousness through keeping the law?

11. What lessons can we learn about suffering and sharing from Paul and Onesimus from the book of Philemon?

12. What scriptural references during the interview had the most impact on you?

13. What, for you, was the most meaningful part of Dr. Campbell’s interview?

Introduction: Welcome to this unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. Our guest today is Douglas Campbell, Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School. Dr. Campbell is author of The Deliverance of God and The Quest for Paul’s Gospel.

J. Michael Feazell: Thanks for being with us.

Douglas Campbell: You’re welcome.

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The Certainty of God’s Love: A Study of Romans 8:18-39

Throughout the book of Romans, Paul has argued that God counts us as righteous because of what Christ has done. Even though we sometimes sin, those sins are counted against the old self that was crucified with Christ; our sins do not count against who we are in Christ. We have an obligation to fight sin — not in order to be saved, but because we are already children of God. In the last part of chapter 8, Paul turns his attention to our glorious future.

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Sharing in the Life of Christ: A Study of Romans 8:1-17

Paul’s letter to the Romans can be divided into three major parts: a presentation of the gospel (chapters 1-8), the place of Israel in God’s plan (chapters 9-11) and exhortations for Christian living (chapters 12-15). Chapter 8 comes near the end of Paul’s explanation of the gospel. It is the climax, and the truths that Paul discusses are astounding.

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The Three-Way Struggle: Law, Sin, and Me: A Study of Romans 7

In his letter to the Romans, Paul has explained that we are saved by grace, not by observing the law, because Christ died for us. This does not give us permission to sin — rather, we should serve God by being slaves of righteousness. Paul clarifies the relationship between law and sin in chapter 7. He begins by giving us an analogy from marriage, and he speaks to the Jewish believers, because they are the ones who are most concerned about the law.

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Enslaved to Righteousness: A Study of Romans 6

In Romans 5, Paul says that Christ saved us even while we were sinners. We are saved by grace, not by keeping the law. He ends that chapter by saying, “Where sin increased, grace increased all the more” (Romans 5:20). God’s grace is always larger than our sin.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Past, Present and Future of Salvation: Romans 5

In the first four chapters of Romans, Paul announced that the gospel is a message about the righteousness of God being given to people because of Jesus Christ. First, Paul described the problem: Everyone deserves to die because we all fall short of what God wants.

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The Example of Abraham: A Study of Romans 4

In the last section of Romans 3, Paul declares that the gospel of salvation announces a righteousness from God, a righteousness that is given “through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe” (3:22). Believers are justified or saved by faith, not by observing the law (3:28).

By: 

Michael Morrison
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From Guilt to Grace: A Study of Romans 3

In Romans 2, Paul explains that both Jews and Gentiles need the gospel — everyone needs salvation, or rescue from judgment. Although some Jews claimed to have an advantage in salvation, Paul explains that Jews are not immune to sin and judgment. Everyone is saved in the same way. So how do people become right with God? Paul explains it in chapter 3 — but first he has to answer some objections.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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