References to: Right Column

Your Invitation to the Kingdom of God

Everyone has some concept of right and wrong, and everyone has done something wrong even by his or her own definition. “To err is human,” says a common proverb. Everyone has betrayed a friend, broken a promise or hurt someone’s feelings. Everyone has experienced the feeling of guilt.

People therefore want God to stay away from them. They know they cannot stand before God with a clear conscience. They know they should obey him, and they also know that they have not. They are ashamed and guilty.

By: 

Neil Earle
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Must We Choose Between Science and the Bible?

Is there an insoluble conflict between the two?

The Bible says God created the earth and all that is in it. Some feel that the Bible says this act of creation occurred about 6,000 years ago. If they are right, what about fossils in museums around the world? Scientists claim they are the remains of creatures that lived millions of years ago. How could this be true?

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The Faith of an Atheist

A discussion with Alister McGrath

Interview conducted by John Halford

JH: Many Christians, when confronted with arguments against the existence of God, become intimidated and go on the defensive, as though the absence of scientific proof of God makes atheism a scientifically sound position. You don’t do that. Why not?

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Why Should We Tell People About Jesus?

Reflections on Romans 10:1-15

In Romans 10:1 Paul says that it was his heart’s desire to see his fellow Israelites saved. But there was a problem: the Israelites that he knew were relying on the law to be right with God (Romans 10:2-4). Christ is the end of all that, Paul says. You cannot be right with God by improving yourself. The only way to be right with God is if God makes you right with him.

By: 

Jonathan Stepp
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Parable of the Lost Son

The parable of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32) is perhaps better named the parable of the lost son, since it is designed to go with the parables of the lost sheep (verses 3-7) and lost coin (verses 8-10). Some have even called it the parable of the prodigal father, because of the father’s extrav­agance. Even today, after centuries of teaching about God’s grace, the father’s willingness to forgive his runaway son is shockingly generous.

This is Jesus’ longest parable: 22 verses. Let’s go through the parable, noting its story, its organization and its lessons.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Prayer: Does it make any difference?

A discussion with Philip Yancey

Multi-award winning writer Philip Yancey has written books that have explored many of the mysteries and wonders of spiritual life. Christian Odyssey's Editor John Halford recently met with Yancey in London to discuss his latest book, Prayer: Does it make any difference?

Question: This new book on prayer seems different in tone to your previous ones. It seems more—well, pastoral. Am I right?

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God Speaks to Us!

man reading a Bible near a windowThe Bible is a window. Have you opened it lately?

Almost all American households have one or more Bibles. Yet more than half of the adults in these households do not read their Bibles during an average week, and only 10 or 15 percent do so daily.

By: 

Paul Kroll
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The Most Excellent Way: 1 Corinthians 13

The church in first-century Corinth was plagued with social divisions and rivalries. Paul explained to them that God gives different people different abilities—not so that some people can exalt themselves over others, but so that everyone will work together for the common good (1 Cor. 12:7). No one is self-sufficient, and no one is unnecessary.

Near the end of chapter 12, he again explains that God appoints different roles in the church. He asks, Is everyone in the church an apostle? Of course not, he implies. It’s silly to expect everyone to have the same role (vv. 28-30).

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How We Got the Bible in English

It was a bleak December afternoon, and a visitor was walking in the graveyard of the parish church of Lutterworth, England, about 90 miles northwest of London. The rector came by as the visitor examined the church’s ancient slate gravestones bearing the names of faithful parishioners of centuries past.

By: 

Keith Stump
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What Is Salvation?

Salvation is a rescue operation. To understand salvation, we need to know what the problem was, what God did about it, and how we respond to it.

When God made humans, he made them "in his own image" (Genesis 1:26-27). We are in some way like God himself. That’s because God has something special in mind for us.

But as we all know, humans can be rather ungodly as well. Humans are noble and crude at the same time. We can have high ideals, and yet be barbaric.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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