References to: Tim Finlay and Jim Herst

Exploring Ruth

What’s in a name?

Ruth is the leading character in this book, which is named after her. The name Ruth means "mercy." The story shows that God’s grace and mercy extend beyond Israel to include all peoples.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Judges: The Misery of Sin

Partial conquest: Judges 1

After Joshua’s death, the Israelites asked God, “Who will be the first to go up and fight for us against the Canaanites?” (verse 1). God chose Judah to do battle and promised, “I have given the land into their hands” (verse 2). Judah may have shown a lack of faith by relying on Simeon for additional support (verse 3).

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Exploring Judges

A man blowing on a hornWhat's in a name?

Judges records the history of Israel during the generations that came after Joshua. One passage summarizes what happened:

By: 

Jim Herst, Tim Finlay
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Joshua: Conflict and Conquest
“The Lord said to Joshua… ‘No one will be able to stand up against you all the days of your life. As I was with Moses, so I will be with you; I will never leave you nor forsake you.
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Exploring Joshua

Events in Joshua's lifeWhat's in a name?

The book is named after its leading character, Joshua, who was appointed by God to lead Israel after the death of Moses (Numbers 27:18-23).

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Fighting Your "Goliaths"

David and GoliathOur illustration highlights the bravery of the shepherd boy, David, who with a single slingshot defeated the heavily armed giant, Goliath. With its ground-level "camera angle" — taken from behind the Philistine warrior — this illustration presents a dramatic study in contrasts.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Exploring Deuteronomy

What’s in a name?

The name Deuteronomy comes from the Septuagint title Deuteronomion, which means “second law.” The title is apt, since Deuteronomy is a second telling of the law. Much of what it says repeats what is said in the previous four books.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Numbers: Life as a Pilgrimage

Organization for Worship: Chapters 1-10:10

Moses numbers the tribes: chapters 1–2

One month after setting up the tabernacle, Moses and Aaron conducted a census. The purpose was to number all men over 20 who qualified for military service. God exempted the Levites because of their religious obligations to the community. The camp was arranged around the tabernacle, showing that the worship of God was central to the nation’s existence. In the New Testament era, members would be placed in the body, with Christ as the head (1 Corinthians 12).

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Tithing in Israel

God instituted a financial system in Israel that enabled the Levitical priesthood to perform its religious functions. This system also made it possible for the Israelites to attend God’s festivals, and provided for the needs of the widows, orphans and poor.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Deuteronomy: God's People Challenged

Outline of Deuteronomy

  1. Introduction (1:1-5)
  2. Historical prologue (1:6–4:43)
  3. Stipulations (4:44–26:19)
  4. Blessings and curses (27:1–30:20)
  5. Succession arrangements and public readings (31:1–34:12)

The outline of the book follows a specific pattern used for treaties in the region, which contained five main sections.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Pages