References to: Joseph Tkach

What Are You Afraid of?

Joseph Tkach

What Are You Afraid of?

Fear is natural, and it can be a lifesaver. But sometimes fear can get out of hand and even become a life-crippling burden.

(3.5 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

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What are you afraid of? Most of us are afraid of something, and some of us are afraid of many things.

Fear can be a very good thing. It can save our lives by making us alert and careful. For example, I'm afraid of drunk drivers. In fact, I'm afraid of most all drivers. That fear makes me more careful in traffic than I would otherwise be.

I watch out for other drivers and even expect them to do dangerous and unusual things. My fear of careless drivers helps me drive more cautiously and to try to anticipate potential danger.

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If Jesus Were Married...

Jesus was not married. But let's suppose for a minute what some people seem to think he would have done.

  • Jesus would inspire total confidence. Oops. One disciple betrayed him, and the others ran off. Only the women were faithful.

  • Jesus would do all the talking. Wrong again—Jesus wants his wife (the church) to talk. She makes a few mistakes, of course, but that's the way we all learn. Both men and women are inspired to speak.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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On Being a Child of God

Jesus’ disciples sometimes had delusions of self-importance. They once asked Jesus, “Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?” (Matthew 18:1). In other words, what personal characteristics are the best examples of what God wants in his people?

Jesus and a child, with the disciplesIt is a good question, and Jesus used it to make an important point: “Unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven” (verse 3).

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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The Logic of Grace

Joseph Tkach

The Logic of Grace

The gospel declares that our sins have been forgiven and we have been made new in Christ without our lifting a finger to make it happen.  That isn’t logical, so we look for other explanations.

(3.7 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

As rational beings, we humans don’t trust things that don’t make sense. When we come across something that doesn’t seem to add up, we don’t like it. We look for alternative explanations and possibilities. If we are going to believe something, we want it to be logical and rational.

Maybe that’s why so many have a hard time with the gospel. When we take the gospel for what the Bible says it is, it doesn’t make sense. It doesn’t add up. The gospel declares that our sins have been forgiven and we have been made new in Christ without our lifting a finger to make it happen.

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St. Andrews, Scotland

Joseph Tkach

St. Andrews, Scotland

St. Andrews was once at the center of the often bloody struggle between the major factions of Christianity.

(4.4 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

Hello from St. Andrews, Scotland.

This ancient Scottish city is best known as the birthplace of golf. The game had its origins here in the 15th century, and St. Andrews Royal and Ancient Golf Club remains the definitive rules-making body of golf to this day.

Over the centuries, these ancient greens have witnessed many intense sporting dramas.

But St. Andrews has also been at the center of a different kind of conflict – one that has been far from sporting. I am talking about the often bloody struggle between the major factions of Christianity.

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A New Look at the Good Samaritan

The Good Samaritan is one of Jesus’ most popular parables. Preachers often use it to encourage people to be unselfish, to think ahead and help others. But there is more to the story than that. Jesus was doing far more than putting hypocritical religious leaders in their place. Let’s take a closer look.

A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he fell into the hands of robbers. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him and went away, leaving him half dead.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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The Gospel: It's Not Fair!

Jesus didn’t carry any swords or spears. He didn’t have an army behind him. His only weapons were his words, and it was his message that got him into trouble. He made people so angry that they wanted to kill him.

A dangerous message

His message was seen not merely as wrong – it was dangerous. It was subversive. It threatened to upset the social world of Judaism. But what kind of message could make the religious leaders so angry that they would kill the messenger?

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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Ascension

Joseph Tkach

Ascension

Forty days after Jesus rose from the dead, he returned to heaven. The Ascension is so important that all the major creeds of Christian faith affirm it.

(3.4 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

Forty days after Jesus rose from the dead, he ascended bodily into heaven. The Ascension is so important that all the major creeds of Christian faith affirm it.

Christ's bodily ascension foreshadows our own entrance into heaven with glorified bodies. 1 John 3:2 tells us: “Dear friends, now we are children of God, and what we will be has not yet been made known. But we know that when he appears, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.”

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Honoring Mothers

Joseph Tkach

Honoring Mothers

A man once told me, “I don’t like being told to go see my mother on some humanly contrived holiday.“ 

(2.9 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

A man once told me, “I don’t like being told to go see my mother on some humanly contrived holiday."

I tried to explain to him that while he might not like the idea of a contrived holiday, he should think about how his poor mother feels when all her friends are relating their stories of the things their children did with them on Mother’s Day, and she can only feel alone and left out.

It isn’t flowers and brunches our mothers want. Those are just symbols of something far more important – the precious gift of children who care enough to share their time.

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Despite Our Doubt

Joseph Tkach

Despite Our Doubt

Even when we have our doubts, Jesus loves us and will not let us go. He has faith for us even when we are in doubt.

(3.8 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

Jesus once healed a paralyzed man whose friends had let him down through the roof on his bed to get him past the crowds to Jesus. But instead of saying to the paralyzed man, “Rise up and walk,” Jesus said, “Son, your sins are forgiven” (Mark 2:5).

The Pharisees were outraged that Jesus, a mere man, would presume to forgive sins. So Jesus told them, “So that you may know that the Son of man has power on earth to forgive sins, I say to the lame man, ‘Rise up and walk” (verses 10-11, paraphrased).

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