References to: Michael Morrison

Touching the World in Two Ways

Michael Morrison

Touching the World in Two Ways

In the modern world, there is often a big disconnect between Christ, Christianity and the church.

(21.3 minutes)
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Biography:
Michael Morrison

Michael Morrison has a PhD from Fuller Theological Seminary. He is Dean of Faculty and Instructor in New Testament for Grace Communion Seminary. He is the author of Sabbath, Circumcision and Tithing and Who Needs a New Covenant? The Rhetorical Function of the Covenant Motif in the Argument of Hebrews.

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Some people think that Christianity is interesting, but basically irrelevant—a harmless superstition. It’s fine for you, they might say, but it really makes no difference to anyone else.

Now, the opposite was true for Jesus: his ministry and teachings did not help himself at all, and they made a big difference for everyone else.

In the modern world, there is often a big disconnect between Christ and Christianity, and today I’d like to explore that a little bit. We’ll start with one of the events in the life of Christ, recorded in Mark chapter 6.

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God Wants All to Be Saved: 1 Timothy 2:1-7

Michael Morrison

Paul sent Timothy to Ephesus to correct a few doctrinal problems in the church. He also sent Timothy a letter outlining his mission—a letter that was designed to be read to the entire congregation so that everyone would know that Timothy was acting with Paul’s authority.

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Michael Morrison
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Stewardship of Talents

Stewardship of Talents

Jesus used a steward as an example in several of his parables, because all of us in some way or another manage things that belong to God. The word “stewardship” often refers to the way that we use money, and it is a reminder that the stuff we have is not really our own, and so we ought to be generous in giving some of it back to God for his use.

(21.7 minutes)
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Biography:
Michael Morrison

Michael Morrison has a PhD from Fuller Theological Seminary. He is Dean of Faculty and Instructor in New Testament for Grace Communion Seminary. He is the author of Sabbath, Circumcision and Tithing and Who Needs a New Covenant? The Rhetorical Function of the Covenant Motif in the Argument of Hebrews.

Articles by Michael Morrison:

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

Christian churches sometimes talk about the idea of “stewardship,” but especially for new people, it is often an unfamiliar word. We don’t know what stewardship is, and we don’t know what a steward is.

But Jesus used a steward as an example in several of his parables, so it is helpful for us to see what he is talking about.

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How to Interpret Prophecy

There are many difficulties involved in interpreting prophecy, but if we take the Bible seriously, we need to study prophecy, because prophecy is a large part of the literature God has inspired to be written and preserved in the Christian canon. Since prophecy encourages us to know God and do his will, it is important for us to study it, even if it is difficult.

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Michael Morrison
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Looking for a Better Life

Mike Morrison

Looking for a Better Life

We have a new life in Christ, but what does that look like in real life? What does it look like in our friendships and relationships with other people?

(32.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Michael Morrison

Michael Morrison has a PhD from Fuller Theological Seminary. He is Dean of Faculty and Instructor in New Testament for Grace Communion Seminary. He is the author of Sabbath, Circumcision and Tithing and Who Needs a New Covenant? The Rhetorical Function of the Covenant Motif in the Argument of Hebrews.

Articles by Michael Morrison:

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

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Our nation is full of immigrants. Many of us were born in a different nation, and we moved to America at some point in our life. Or maybe it was our great-great grandparents who moved to America from “the old country.” Even if we are Native Americans, if we go back far enough, we will see that our ancestors came to this land from somewhere else.

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Humans in the Image of God

God created the first humans in the image of God, in the likeness of God (Genesis 1:26-30). What does the “image of God” mean? In what way are we humans different than animals, and in what way are we like God? How has sin affected the image? Is this image relevant to Christian growth, sanctification and the ministry of the church?

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Michael Morrison
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Forty-Two Men and Five Women: A Study of Matthew 1:1-16

Many modern readers feel that the New Testament begins in the most boring way possible: a list of unusual and hard-to-pronounce names.

However, ancient readers would have found a number of interesting things in this list.

Women in the list

The ancestors of Jesus, the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham:

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Michael Morrison
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Special Report: What You Have Heard Is True!

About 30 years after Jesus Christ, a wealthy man named Theophilus became interested in following Jesus. Some of the stories he heard about Jesus seemed too strange to be true. So he asked an investigator to get the facts about what Jesus had really done and taught.

This special investigator learned as much as he could about Jesus' life, work and teachings. He then wrote an organized documentary about Jesus. We call it the Gospel of Luke.

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Michael Morrison
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One at a Time, Please: A Study of 1 Corinthians 14:26-39

What did first-century believers do in their worship meetings? The Bible gives us only a few glimpses into the details. Paul gives a description in 1 Corinthians 14:26: “When you come together, each of you has a hymn, or a word of instruction, a revelation, a tongue or an interpretation.” Every believer had a part to play, each according to the way that God had gifted them.

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Are You Out of Your Mind? A Study of 1 Corinthians 14:13-25

The believers in Corinth liked to speak in tongues, but Paul encouraged them to focus instead on gifts that build up the church. He explains why the gift of prophesying is better than tongues for use in church meetings.

Does anyone understand? (verses 13-17)

Believers meet together in order to build one another up (v. 26). But tongues are of private value; they do not help others. So Paul exhorts, “the one who speaks in a tongue should pray that they may interpret what they say.” If they speak in tongues, they should desire that their words be explained.

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