References to: Michael Morrison

The Prophets and the Sabbath

Let’s now consider two facts about the Sabbath in the Old Testament:

  • The Israelites were punished severely for breaking the Sabbath. Doesn’t this indicate its importance?

  • Both Israelites and Gentiles were praised for keeping the Sabbath, and the prophets predicted a time when Gentiles would keep the Sabbath. Doesn’t this indicate that it is God’s ideal for us today?

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

The Sabbath and the Ten Commandments

The Sabbath was commanded before Sinai — only a few weeks before. We find it in Exodus 16. There, Moses told the people that the seventh day would be a day of rest, a holy rest day (verse 23). Nothing in the account implies that the seventh day was holy before this. The Lord, through Moses, gave some new instructions in connection with the manna that the Lord was giving the Israelites. He told them to cook all their food in advance (verse 23) and not to travel away from their tents on the Sabbath (verse 29).

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Was the Sabbath Commanded at Creation?

Now we are better prepared to study the specific issue of the Sabbath, which may be the most controversial of the Old Testament laws. Some people believe that Christians should keep the Sabbath on the seventh day of the week; some advocate the first day. Many say that the Sabbath is an old covenant ritual law and does not apply to Christians. But in some ways the Sabbath is not like sacrifices or other old covenant laws. We need to examine those differences and see the arguments for and against. The arguments can be complex, so we will take several chapters to examine them thoroughly.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

The Law is Holy, Just and Good — a Study of Matthew 5

We are no longer under the supervision of the law, writes Paul (Galatians 3:25). But the same apostle also writes, "the law is holy, and the commandment is holy, righteous and good" (Romans 7:12). He even writes that the old covenant came "with glory" (2 Corinthians 3:7). (However, he says in the next verse that the new covenant is "even more glorious." We’ll examine 2 Corinthians 3 in chapter 17.)

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Hebrews and the Change of Covenants

The book of Hebrews also has much to say about the covenants. Again, we will go through the relevant passages verse by verse to make sure that we are not lifting verses out of context. We want to see the thought-flow of this section in Hebrews. 

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

The New Covenant Makes Some Biblical Laws Obsolete

Early Christians may have been surprised that any biblical command (including the sacrifices and rituals) could become unnecessary. If God had given these laws, who could say that they were done away? Only one authority could do away with God-given commands: God. So we look to the New Testament to see the authority for doing away with any of God’s laws.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

A Christian Council About Old Testament Laws

Acts 15 describes the most important meeting the early church had. The future of the church was at stake — was it to be a Jewish group, or would it allow Gentiles?

The council of Jerusalem forms the decisive step that makes the Gentile mission dominant.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

The Eternal Validity of God's Law

Physical circumcision, which was once commanded by God, is no longer required. How can this be? God, the perfect and unchangeable Lawgiver, changed a fundamental aspect of his law — not only circumcision, but also sacrifices and temples and priesthoods. The infallible Scriptures contain commands that are obsolete.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Circumcision: A New Way to Keep an Old Law

Almost all Christians agree that circumcision is an obsolete law, for the New Testament is very clear about it. But it will be helpful for us to examine in greater detail why it is obsolete. Although you may not have any questions about circumcision itself, the lessons we learn from circumcision will help us evaluate laws that you do have questions about. So even though it might at first seem to be irrelevant, it is actually very relevant to our study. Let’s begin by seeing how circumcision started.

 

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Does God Make Mistakes?

God does not change (Malachi 3:6; James 1:17). Indeed, his Hebrew name Yahweh indicates that he is The One Who Is, or the Eternal One (Exodus 3:14). But if God remains the same, how can his laws change? Can the Eternal give temporary laws?

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles by: 

Pages