References to: Michael Morrison

Parable of the Lost Son

The parable of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32) is perhaps better named the parable of the lost son, since it is designed to go with the parables of the lost sheep (verses 3-7) and lost coin (verses 8-10). Some have even called it the parable of the prodigal father, because of the father’s extrav­agance. Even today, after centuries of teaching about God’s grace, the father’s willingness to forgive his runaway son is shockingly generous.

This is Jesus’ longest parable: 22 verses. Let’s go through the parable, noting its story, its organization and its lessons.

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Michael Morrison
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The Gift of Prophecy: A Study of 1 Corinthians 14:1-12

The early Christians in Corinth were fascinated with spiritual gifts. After telling them to “desire the greater gifts” (12:31), Paul described to them “the most excellent way”—love (13:1-13). Paul then weighed the relative merits of two spiritual gifts—one the Corinthians had over-valued, and one that they did not value enough. This problem warranted considerable space in Paul’s letter.

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Michael Morrison
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What Is Salvation?

Salvation is a rescue operation. To understand salvation, we need to know what the problem was, what God did about it, and how we respond to it.

When God made humans, he made them "in his own image" (Genesis 1:26-27). We are in some way like God himself. That’s because God has something special in mind for us.

But as we all know, humans can be rather ungodly as well. Humans are noble and crude at the same time. We can have high ideals, and yet be barbaric.

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Michael Morrison
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The Message of Hosea 11

Hosea 11 illustrates God’s persevering love for his children – a love so strong that it continues despite rebellion, a love that leads God to restore his people after he has punished them.

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Entering God's Rest: A Study of Hebrews 4

The letter to the Hebrews weaves theology and practical application. After each doctrinal section, it urges the readers to do something as a result. This often takes the form of “Therefore, let us do such and such.”

As part of that pattern, chapter 4 begins with the word therefore, meaning that the exhortations we read in chapter 4 are built on a point made earlier. So our study of chapter 4 must begin with a review of chapter 3. Chapter 3 tells us to look to Jesus, because he is superior to the angels and to Moses.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Do Good to All: A Study of Galatians 6

In many of his letters, Paul concludes with a list of commands. In Galatians, he gives a series of proverbs. He wants his readers to be guided by the Spirit, not a list of laws, so he gives them principles that require some thought.

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Michael Morrison
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The New NIV: Popular English Translation Updated

Biblica (formerly known as the International Bible Society) has announced an update for the New International Version. Since the NIV is the translation we use in Christian Odyssey, we thought it might be helpful for our readers to have some background about why the NIV was updated.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Watching God Work in the Philippines

“We aren’t coming for a vacation—we are coming to serve. We don’t want to be a burden—we want to do something that helps,” we explained to the Philippines office personnel. So they put us to work, and we were able to see God at work in a dozen ways, in a dozen places. Join us for the highlights of our two-week “mission immersion” trip in the Philippines.

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Michael Morrison
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Is a Short-Term Mission Worth It?

Traditionally, a missionary’s work required tremendous commitment—many years or even a lifetime away from home, living in remote areas in primitive conditions, battling disease, paganism and hostility—and maybe even a martyr’s death—with no guarantee of results.

To swoop in on a jet for a few days of hard work and fun, working with friendly people in simple but safe surroundings—is that really a mission?

It can be. Or it can be a waste of time and of money that could be better used in other ways. The keys to success are preparation, mutual respect and ongoing commitment.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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