References to: Michael Morrison

Four Point Plan For Spiritual Growth

What is the goal of our Christian lives? It is to become like Jesus Christ. Robert Mulholland Jr. puts it this way: "being conformed to the image of Christ for the sake of others" (Invitation to a Journey, InterVarsity Press, 1993).

Many have observed that Christians are to be conformed to the measure of Jesus Christ, but few have so explicitly said that our goal is for the sake of others.

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Disciples Who Didn't Understand

Christianity has never been doctrinally perfect. Even the apostolic churches were not perfect. In fact, much of the New Testament was written to correct various wrong ideas. In Corinth, for example, Christians were tolerating incest, suing one another in court, eating in pagan temples and misbehaving at the Lord's Supper. Some thought they should be celibate, and some thought they should divorce their non-Christian spouses. Paul had to correct all these ideas, and history tells us that he had only limited success.

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What the Bible Says About Divorce and Remarriage

"Anyone who divorces his wife and marries another woman commits adultery, and the man who marries a divorced woman commits adultery" (Luke 16:18). From this and similar scriptures, some people conclude that divorce and Christianity are incompatible.

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A Hunger for God

Mike Morrison

A Hunger for God

I know I should love God with all my heart, but my heart really doesn’t care much about that – my heart wants a good job, a quiet life in the suburbs, a few friends, and that’s about all I want. And isn’t it God’s job to give me the desires of my heart?

(23.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Michael Morrison

Michael Morrison has a PhD from Fuller Theological Seminary. He is Dean of Faculty and Instructor in New Testament for Grace Communion Seminary. He is the author of Sabbath, Circumcision and Tithing and Who Needs a New Covenant? The Rhetorical Function of the Covenant Motif in the Argument of Hebrews.

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Woody Allen is not only a comedian, but also sometimes a philosopher with serious observations about life. As a movie director, he often wanted to deal with serious issues rather than comedy. He has a wit and a knack for humor, and that helped him earn money to do the other movies that he really wanted to do. He knows that life is not all about laughter; there is something more to life that he wants to find and experience – but I suspect that he has not found it.

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How Many Points in a Parable?

Book review: Interpreting the Parables by Craig L. Blomberg. 1990. Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press. 334 pages. (A new edition was published in 2012, but this review is based on the original edition)

Scholars have often proclaimed that each of Jesus’ parables makes only one main point. Classic analyses by Adolf Jülicher, C.H. Dodd, Joachim Jeremias and Robert Stein decry the overly allegorical approaches of medieval commentators, who saw spiritual significance in every detail.

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More Parables of the Kingdom

Matthew 13 is the largest collection of parables that are specifically said to be about the kingdom of God. But Matthew has five additional parables describing the kingdom of God, and Mark has another. A brief analysis of these parables will show that Jesus did not describe the kingdom as an ideal age after his return. Rather, he described the kingdom as an age leading up to the final judgment.

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Matthew 16: What Kind of Messiah?

Jesus praised Peter for accurately identifying him as the Messiah, and he promised him great authority. But in almost the next breath, Jesus gave Peter one of the strongest rebukes in all of Scripture. The incident, and the teaching of Jesus that surrounds it, tells us much about the purpose of the Messiah.

Seeking a sign

Pharisees

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Matthew 13: Parables of the Kingdom

We need to make sure that our description of the kingdom is compatible with the description Jesus gave. Jesus often preached about the kingdom of God—but what did he say about it? Did he describe peace and prosperity, health and wealth, law and order? Did he get into details of governmental organization?

No, we do not need to know those things. The most important thing we need to know about the kingdom is how we get there in the first place—and when Jesus described the kingdom, that is what he talked about.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Matthew 9: The Purpose of Healings

Matthew 9, like most other chapters in Matthew, tells of several events in the life of Christ. But these are not random reports—Matthew sometimes puts stories next to each other because they shed light on each other. They give physical examples of spiritual truths. In chapter 9, Matthew tells several stories that are also found in Mark and Luke—but Matthew’s version is much shorter, more to the point.

Authority to forgive

Jesus Healing

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Matthew 7: Sermon on the Mount, Part 3

In Matthew 5, Jesus explains that true righteousness is internal, a matter of the heart, not just of behavior. In chapter 6, he explains that our religious activities must be sincere, not performances designed to make us look good. In those chapters, Jesus addresses two problems that occur when people focus on external behavior as the main definition of righteousness: external behavior is not all that God wants, and people are tempted to pretend instead of being changed in the heart.

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