References to: Michael Morrison

Rich in Good Works - 2 Corinthians 9

As Paul worked to spread the gospel in the gentile world, he also worked to have the gentiles give an offering to poor believers in Jerusalem. We see evidence of this offering in several of his letters; it was a consistent theme of his work.

Paul saw a vital connection between God’s grace and our giving. Just as God has been gracious toward us, we should be gracious toward others, sharing the spiritual and physical blessings God has given us. Although good works can never pay for God’s grace, they are an expected result of God’s grace working in our lives.

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The Grace of Giving - 2 Corinthians 8

When Paul met with the original apostles, they agreed to divide the mission field — Paul would focus on the gentiles, and they would focus on the Jews (Gal. 2:9). But they did make one request of Paul: that he remember that many believers in Jerusalem needed financial help (2:10).

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Paul and the New Covenant - 2 Corinthians 3

Paul begins this chapter by pointing out that he, the apostle Christ used to begin the Corinthian church, did not need a “letter of recommendation” from anybody: “Are we beginning to commend ourselves again? Or do we need, like some people, letters of recommendation to you or from you? You yourselves are our letter, written on our hearts, known and read by everyone” (verses 1-2).

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Living the Trinitarian Life

Mike Morrison

Living the Trinitarian Life

Love is God's most basic characteristic. The life that he wants to share with us is not just a biochemical existence – he wants us to have a life that is characterized by love – a life of joy and kindness and appreciation.

(28.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Michael Morrison

Michael Morrison has a PhD from Fuller Theological Seminary. He is Dean of Faculty and Instructor in New Testament for Grace Communion Seminary. He is the author of Sabbath, Circumcision and Tithing and Who Needs a New Covenant? The Rhetorical Function of the Covenant Motif in the Argument of Hebrews.

Articles by Michael Morrison:

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I’ve got a problem.

Actually, I’ve got two problems.

They are kind of personal problems, so I hope you don’t mind me mentioning them.

But you are probably already familiar with them, because you have the same two problems.

The first problem is sin, and the second is death.

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The Resurrection Body - 1 Corinthians 15b

Ancient Greek philosophers believed that the world of spirit is perfect, whereas the world of matter is bad. The human soul is good, but it is trapped in the physical world. The body is a like a tomb, and the soul needs to escape.

These beliefs affected the congregation in Corinth. Some church members thought that the body is bad, so they denied all bodily pleasures, even in marriage. Others went to the opposite extreme: since the body will eventually be discarded, it doesn’t matter what a person does in the body.

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Will We Live Again? 1 Corinthians 15a

Every spring, Easter reminds Christians that Jesus rose from the dead. His resurrection was certainly good news for him, and we rejoice that our Friend lives again. But Easter tells us more than that — it tells us something about our life, too.

A core component of the gospel

Paul wrote his letter to the church at Corinth to address several problems and questions that the members had. In chapter 15, he responds to the idea that no one will be resurrected from the dead.

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Exegetical Notes on 1 Corinthians 12

Features of the literary structure

Paul writes, I don’t want you to be ignorant about the spiritual things (v.1). This is similar to 7:1, so Paul may be addressing the topic of spiritual things at the request of the Corinthians. Fee notes that "this is a nearly universal conviction (570n), but notes that Paul’s corrective comments imply that the Corinthians were not simply asking for information. I suspect that they did not admit any ignorance about this topic, so 12:1b may indicate that Paul is initiating the topic (cf. 11:18).

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A Command Paul Did Not Obey - 1 Corinthians 9

In his first letter to the Corinthian church, Paul deals with a number of questions the Corinthian Christians had. Some of them felt free to eat meat in pagan temples; others thought that would be sinful.

Paul explains that Christian liberty must be voluntarily limited, and in this case the “free” Christians should stay out of pagan temples so they would not hurt the faith of weak Christians. He illustrates his conclusion by saying that he would not eat meat at all, if eating would cause someone to fall into sin (8:13).

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Are Some Meats Unclean?

A Look at the Old Testament Concept of Uncleanness and Whether the New Testament Says Some Meats Are Unclean

Among the regulations God gave the ancient Israelites were various laws about cleanness and uncleanness. These laws were not concerned with hygiene, but ceremonial status. People who were unclean were not allowed to participate in religious ceremonies.

Do these laws apply to Christians? Let’s examine the evidence in the five books of Moses and the New Testament.

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