References to: Mike Feazell

The Suffering God

I don’t get it. Why does God just stand by and let such horrible things happen as go on in this world, when he could stop them if he wanted to? Doesn’t God care?

Yes, God cares. But I doubt anybody can give an entirely satisfying answer to that question. Here is what we do know: The way we best understand God and our suffering is to look at Jesus Christ. He is God; he is human, too. God became human, without ceasing to be God, for our sakes. That is what we mean when we say Christ was fully God and fully man.

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Dying and Rising With Christ

"OK, I see that salvation is accomplished by God from start to finish and not by me, but I'd still like to know more about how we should live. I've heard people talking about `spiritual disciplines.' What are spiritual disciplines?"

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The Fig Tree and the Temple in Mark 11:12-16

Jesus’ cursing of the unfruitful fig tree presents Christians with a dilemma unique in the Gospels. A cursory reading of the text portrays Jesus as acting quite out of character, using his divine power in selfish anger to curse a mere tree because it did not act contrary to nature by providing him fruit out of season to satisfy his hunger. Many ideas have been brought forward in an effort to explain the apparent anomaly of Jesus’ behavior in the fig tree incident.

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Is There Only One Right Way to Worship God?

Liturgy has become a hot topic in the church.

“Excuse me, but what’s a liturgy?” you ask.

Liturgy is the pattern or program of worship chosen by a church. It includes the gospel-related topics, themes, forms, symbols, styles, seasons and days that help facilitate effective worship for that particular church. In other words, liturgy refers to the whole set of seasons, days, tools and methods we use to worship, celebrate and enjoy God.

By: 

Randall Dick and J. Michael Feazell
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Death Ain't What It Used to Be

While sipping coffee and browsing news one morning, I came across a lead sentence so amusing I had to write it down. Take a look.

Fri Dec 2, 11:22 AM ET NEW YORK (Reuters Health)—Women who go through menopause in their early 40s may have a slightly higher risk of death later in life compared with their peers, a large U.S. study suggests.

By: 

J. Michael Feazell
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Obeying God

"I still don’t get one thing. If we are forgiven already, what’s to stop us from continuing to sin? I mean, I realize we are saved by God’s mercy and not by being good, and I realize we could never be good enough anyway, and I realize that even our goodness is tainted with sin, but still, doesn’t God want us to stop sinning?"

You’re worried that if we put too much emphasis on grace, people won’t care how they behave?

"Yes, I guess I am."

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Another Look at Faith

One night recently I couldn’t sleep, and after an hour or so of tossing and turning I got up and went to the kitchen. I stared into the fridge for a minute or so, then stared into the freezer for a while, and finally into the food cupboard, and then started over. At last, sometime during the third or fourth survey of the fridge, I pulled some leftover meatloaf from behind the milk and made myself a sandwich, and went to see if anything good might be on TV at 2 o’clock in the morning.

By: 

Mike Feazell
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A Simple Matter of Trust

How can you be sure you are in the kingdom of God and not destined for the lake of fire? Many Christians worry that in the final analysis, they might not be counted among the children of God and will face their fate in the destruction of the lake that burns with fire and brimstone (Revelation 20:8).

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Standing in Christ Alone

"OK, I can see that we're saved by grace and not by works, but I'm still not clear on a couple of things. For example, some passages in the New Testament indicate that we won't be saved unless we are doing good works. How do those passages fit with the passages that tell us we are saved by grace and not by works?"

Good question.

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