References to: You're Included

Daniel Thimell: Christ Completed His Work

Dan Thimell

Daniel Thimell: Christ Completed His Work

Christianity is not primarily about right behavior, but about relying on Christ's completed work for us.

(29.5 minutes)
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Biography:
Daniel Thimell

Daniel Thimell received his doctorate from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. He is associate professor of theological-historical studies at Oral Roberts University. He is the author of God, Grace, and the Gospel, and co-editor of Christ in Our Place: The Humanity of God in Christ for the Reconciliation of the World. For an edited transcript of all four of his interviews with us, click here.

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If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. “A lot of preaching is about 'works religion' and 'performance.' Has that been your experience?

2. How do you understand, “Behavior is a response to grace, it’s not a condition of grace”?

3. “The obedience we are called to engage can only be carried out by God’s grace.” Why?

4. Dr. Thimell emphasized “Christ-centered preaching.” Why is this important?

5. What did you think of the comment, “marriage is a covenant, not a contract”?

6. Salvation was described as a completed gift in Christ, not us doing “our part.” Your thoughts?

7. The “prodigal son” illustrates God’s unconditional love for us. Why is this hard to accept?

8. How do you view, “there are negative consequences for sinful behavior, but we are forgiven”?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Welcome to You’re Included, the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian heology. With us today is Dr. Daniel Thimell, Associate Professor of Theological and Historical Studies at Oral Roberts University. Dr. Thimell earned his Ph.D. from the University of Aberdeen in 1993. He has 30 years of pastoral experience and has taught at Trinity College in Bristol, England, and the University of Aberdeen in Scotland.

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Gordon Fee: Like Father, Like Son

Gordon Fee

Gordon Fee: Like Father, Like Son

Dr. Gordon Fee talks about the renewed image of the Father through his likeness shared in Christ the Son.

(28.3 minutes)
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Biography:
Gordon D. Fee

Dr. Gordon Fee is emeritus professor of New Testament at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. For a PDF of all three interviews, click here. Among his many publications are
     How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth (co-authored with Douglas Stuart; now in its fourth edition)
     How to Choose a Translation for All Its Worth (co-authored with Mark Strauss)

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Why is viewing the Father “just like Jesus Christ” so important for understanding him?

2. How does a Trinitarian concept of God help us escape false ideas regarding his nature?

3. How can taking the book of John seriously help us to know who God is and what he is like?

4. Why do “broken” human fathers often affect our view of God and his desire for a relationship?

5. Please share your thoughts on our being Christ’s “image bearers” by loving our enemies.

6. Why is it usually better to “love our neighbors as they are” rather than try to “convert” them?

7. Dr. Fee said, “True evangelism has to stem out of good relationships.” Please comment. 

8. The distinction was made between “doing good” and “doing works.” Your thoughts?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Welcome to You’re Included, the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. With us today is author and New Testament scholar Dr. Gordon Fee. Dr. Fee is Professor Emeritus of Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. He’s considered a leading expert in the field of biblical interpretation and is author of many books, including How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth and How to Read the Bible Book by Book, both of which he co-authored with Douglas Stuart.

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Robert Walker: Why the Incarnation Is Good News

Robert Walker

Robert Walker: Why the Incarnation Is Good News

God the Father was in Jesus Christ, as God become human, who took our humanity into the heart of God and gave us a new humanity in the process.

(29.8 minutes)
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Biography:
Robert T. Walker

Robert T. Walker is nephew of the late Thomas F. Torrance. Walker edited Torrance's lecture notes into two books describing Torrance's teachings about the person and work of Jesus Christ. The first is Incarnation: The Person and Life of Christ (InterVarsity, 2008); the second is Atonement: The Person and Work of Christ (InterVarsity, 2009). For a PDF of all three interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. What does the phrase “God became man” mean to you?

2. Please comment on the statement, “Jesus didn’t come to show us the way; he is the way.”

3. How does living out our “new humanity” in Christ relieve us of fear and guilt?

4. What are your thoughts on Jesus’ birth, death, resurrection, and ascension being ours as well?

5. What do you think was meant by, “We’re called to a new identity, not good behavior”?

6. It was said that the gospel is not good news if it involves making ourselves better. Why?

7. How does seeing God as a “communion of love” enhance our personal relationships?

8. Why should the gospel be presented in terms of joy and rest rather than fear and anxiety?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: What is a Christian missing out on if they don’t have an incarnational understanding of the gospel?

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Jeff McSwain: Reading the Bible With Jesus as the Guide

Jeff McSwain

Jeff McSwain: Reading the Bible With Jesus as the Guide

We all bring a personal persuasion to our interpretation of Scripture, so it's important for us to read the Bible through a Christ-centered lens.

(35.8 minutes)
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Biography:
Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

For an edited transcript of all six of our interviews with Jeff McSwain, click here.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Why should we speak of both the Holy Scriptures and Jesus Christ as the Word of God?

2. How do you understand “Jesus Christ is the visible expression of the invisible God?”

3. What are some of the pitfalls in the attitude, “Don’t give me any theology, just the Bible”?

4. Please share your thoughts on the so-called “literal” view of Scripture.

5. How are figures of speech (for example, metaphor and hyperbole) important to biblical understanding?

6. Why is humility and repentance important in biblical interpretation?

7. Why is it important to read Scripture through holistic and incarnational lenses?

8. What was meant by Christ being the key to interpreting all of Scripture?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Welcome to You’re Included, the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian Theology. Today we’re talking with Jeff McSwain, Founder and Executive Director of Reality Ministries of Durham, North Carolina. Jeff earned his Master’s Degree in theology studying with Alan and J.B. Torrance in Scotland’s University of St. Andrews. His passion is to combine sound theological teaching with the everyday practice of youth ministry.

Jeff, thanks for being here.

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Alan Torrance: God's Wrath, Hell, and the Role of Science

Alan Torrance

Alan Torrance: God's Wrath, Hell, and the Role of Science

The wrath of God and hell come about because of God's love. Good science indicates God's existence.

(30.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Alan Torrance

Alan J. Torrance is professor of systematic theology at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. His work includes Persons in Communion: Trinitarian Description and Human Participation and The Theological Grounds for Advocating Forgiveness and Reconciliation in the Sociopolitical Realm. He earned his doctorate at theology at the University of Erlangen-Nurnberg in Germany.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Why is it important that we not separate God’s wrath from his love?

2. How do you feel about the statement, “God loves the victimizer as well as the victim?”

3. Why was it emphasized that we must not project our human concepts of wrath onto God?

4. “God’s wrath must be understood in the light of his redemptive purpose”—any thoughts?

5. How do you understand hell in the sense of “alienation from God?”

6. Please comment on, “hell is populated by people who are loved and forgiven by God.”

7. Why do you think people assume that death in this life is the cutoff point for salvation?

8. What do you think about good science being described as a “wonderful gift of God?”

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Announcer: Welcome to a special edition of You’re Included recorded in the ancient Scottish city of St. Andrews. St. Andrews is the home of the University of St. Andrews, Scotland’s oldest university, founded in 1413. St. Andrews enjoys the reputation as one of the finest institutions of higher education in the United Kingdom. It is the home of St. Mary’s College, the university’s renowned divinity school. In St. Mary’s nearly 500-year-old College Hall, You’re Included host, J.

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George Hunsinger: Our Lives Are Hidden in Christ

George Hunsinger

George Hunsinger: Our Lives Are Hidden in Christ

Colossians 3:3 has been called a decisive verse for the entire New Testament. Our lives in Christ are real, and yet can't always be seen.

(28.5 minutes)
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Biography:
George Hunsinger

George Hunsinger is a Presbyterian minister and professor of systematic theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, NJ. For a PDF with all four of his interviews, click here. His published works include
___The Eucharist and Ecumenism: Let Us Keep the Feast (Cambridge, 2008)

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. What do you make of Dr. Hunsinger’s statement, “We live in “the time between the times”?

2. How does viewing time in sequence and simultaneously affect our understanding of Scripture?

3. How do you see sheep and goats verses in relation to “the world as the object of God’s love”?

4. Regarding hope: “Just because it’s hidden doesn’t mean that it’s not already real.” Comments?

5. “Grace translates everything out of the realm of necessity into the realm of freedom.” Why?

6. In what ways does “God’s free grace elicit our free response of total self giving back to him?”

7. “Grace has a way of prevailing even when it doesn’t seem to make rational sense.” Thoughts?

8. What does God’s being “eternally bound to humanity through Jesus Christ” mean to you?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching. 

Introduction: You’re Included is the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of a Christ-centered Trinitarian theology. Today’s guest is Dr. George Hunsinger, Princeton Theological Seminary’s Hazel Thompson McCord Professor of Systematic Theology. Dr. Hunsinger is an ordained Presbyterian minister and a major contributor to the latest Presbyterian catechism.

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Elmer Colyer: Hell: The Love and Wrath of God

Dr. Elmer Colyer

Elmer Colyer: Hell: The Love and Wrath of God

Elmer Colyer discusses how hell and God's wrath are related to God's love.

(32.7 minutes)
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Biography:
Elmer Colyer

Dr. Elmer Colyer is professor of historical theology at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary, and pastor of a Methodist congregation. He is editor of The Promise of Trinitarian Theology: Theologians in Dialogue with T. F. Torrance and Evangelical Theology in Transition: Theologians in Dialogue with Donald Bloesch. He is author of How to Read T.F. Torrance: Understanding His Trinitarian and Scientific Theology and The Nature of Doctrine in T. F. Torrance’s Theology.

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Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Suggested topics:

1. Why is God’s love and mercy inseparable from his wrath and judgment?

2. Why do we tend to divide God’s traits rather than seeing them as one unified attribute?

3. Why should we see God’s character as revealed in Christ and not project our ideas onto him?

4. How does “double predestination” promote legalism and works righteousness?

5. How do you understand the statement, “God made provision for hell on the cross”?

6. Why do you think Dr. Colyer said that “hell is a better place for sinners than heaven”?

7. Why is it as wrong for Christians to see Jesus as a “political conqueror” as it was for the Jews?

8. Was the “Fatherhood of God” as revealed in the New Testament encouraging to you? How?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Elmer, thanks for being with us.

Elmer Colyer: It’s delightful to be with you again.

JMF: It’s a pleasure to have you.

Hell. We want to talk about hell today. A lot of churches will not even preach about it. In those, you never hear anybody preaching about hell. Other churches, that’s pretty much what they preach about every week. So why the divide? What does Trinitarian theology have to say about hell? And how can we understand it in terms of the grace of God and the judgment of God?

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Paul Louis Metzger: Consumer Christians, and God’s Love

Paul Louis Metzger

Paul Louis Metzger: Consumer Christians, and God’s Love

Dr. Metzger talks about participation in the triune life of God.

(28.3 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Paul Louis Metzger

Dr. Paul Louis Metzger is Professor of Christian Theology and Theology of Culture at Multnomah University in Portland, Oregon. For a PDF of all four interviews, click here. He is author of Consuming Jesus: Beyond Race and Class Divisions in a Consumer Church,
The Word of Christ and the Word of Culture: Sacred and Secular Through the Theology of Karl Barth,
and
Connecting Christ: How to Discuss Jesus in a World of Diverse Paths.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Please comment on the importance of viewing Christian doctrine from the “vantage point of Trinitarian thought.”

2. How does the interpersonal nature of God help us look at the Bible relationally?

3. Why is it critical to see the Kingdom as a “church community” and not just as a future event?

4. Dr. Metzger said that relationality must be at the core of kingdom community building. Why?

5. In what ways can the “contemporary consumer problem” negatively impact our spirituality?

6. Why do you think it was stressed that we get beyond the idea of “sin management?”

7.  How does participation (life in God) guard us from legalism and performance based     spirituality?

8. How did the concept, “it’s not about measuring up, it’s the measureless overflow of God’s          love in Christ,” impact you personally?

9. Please expound on Dr. Metgzer’s call to “be who you are in Christ.”

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Thanks for joining us on another edition of You’re Included, the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. Our guest is Dr. Paul Louis Metzger, Professor of Christian Theology and Theology of Culture at Multnomah Biblical Seminary of Multnomah University in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Metzger’s passion is integrating theology and spirituality with cultural sensitivity. He’s a member of the Center of Theological Inquiry in Princeton, New Jersey, and has developed a strategic ministry partnership with Dr.

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Gary Deddo: What Is Jesus Doing in Our Sanctification?

Gary Deddo

Gary Deddo: What Is Jesus Doing in Our Sanctification?

Dr. Gary Deddo gives new perspective to the saying “What Would Jesus Do?”

(32.1 minutes)
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Biography:
Gary Deddo

Dr. Gary Deddo works for Grace Communion International and is president of Grace Communion Seminary. He earned his PhD at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland under Professor James Torrance. He is Founding President of the T. F. Torrance Theological Fellowship, and author of numerous articles and books, including Karl Barth’s Theology of Relations and George McDonald: The Devotional Guide to His Writing. Click here for articles by Gary Deddo.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

For a transcript of seven interviews with Dr. Deddo, click here.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. How can reading the Bible “theologically” help us piece the parts of its message together?

2. How does theology give meaning to the text and help us to know who God is?

3. Do you think we should be able to explain the gospel as accurately as possible? Why?

4. How do you understand the statement, “Christ both justifies and sanctifies us”?

5. What are your thoughts on justification and sanctification being two parts of one whole?”

6. How do you view participation in Christ rather than us doing something for or without him?  

7. Dr. Deddo described obedience as fellowship (or involvement) with Christ. Please comment.

8. What are your thoughts on the “unbeliever” already belonging to Christ?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Michael Morrison: Thanks for joining us on another edition of You’re Included, the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology in today’s complex world. I’m Mike Morrison. Our guest today is Gary Deddo, Senior Editor at InterVarsity Press and Founding President of the Thomas F. Torrance Theological Fellowship. Dr. Deddo is author of Karl Barth’s Theology of Relations.

Dr. Deddo, you have spent a lot of your life studying theology. What prompted or motivated you to go into that?

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Andrew Root: God Turns Death Into Life

Dr. Andrew Root

Andrew Root: God Turns Death Into Life

We do not need to be afraid of doubt. When we fear that "God is not here," that is when God is likely to be found.

(33.5 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Andrew Root

Dr. Andrew Root, Assistant Professor of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, received his doctorate from Princeton Theological Seminary. He is author of Revisiting Relational Youth Ministry: From a Strategy of Influence to a Theology of Incarnation. For a PDF file of all four interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Why do you think Dr. Root uses the terms “relational” and “incarnational” interchangeably?

2. Why is ministry more relevant if it comes from the heart through our own broken experience?

3. What makes today’s youth so sensitive to a “façade of righteousness”?

4. Why is contemplating our broken humanity more useful than moralism and legalism?

5. How can teaching “life and death” be more effective than focusing on “right and wrong”?

6. Do you agree that divorce can affect a child’s sense of personal identity? Why?

7. How have you personally experienced God’s presence in moments of despair and loneliness?

8. How can building a conversation around our doubts and fears, as suggested, benefit us?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Welcome to another edition of You’re Included, the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. Today we’re talking with Andrew Root, Assistant Professor of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota.

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