References to: Ascension

Celebrating Jesus' Ascension

Many Christians celebrate the Ascension of our Lord Jesus Christ. Some celebrate exactly 40 days after Easter; others celebrate the following Sunday.

The Ascension does not have quite the same prominence in the Christian calendar as the “big three”—Christmas, Good Friday and Easter. Perhaps this is because we underestimate the importance of this event. We may even think of it as anticlimactic, after the trauma of the Crucifixion and the triumph of the Resurrection.

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Jesus—The Complete Salvation Package

Near the end of his Gospel, the apostle John made these intriguing comments: “Jesus performed many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in this book…. If every one of them were written down, I suppose that even the whole world would not have room for the books that would be written” (John 20:30; 21:25). Given these comments, and noting differences among the four Gospels, we conclude that these accounts were not written to be exhaustive records of Jesus’ life.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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Exploring the Book of Acts Chapter 1

The Dedications of Luke and Acts (Luke 1:1-4; Acts 1:1-2)

Luke began his book, which we call the “Acts of the Apostles” or simply “Acts,” by continuing his story where he ended it in the Gospel. Luke’s Gospel had described Jesus’ work in Galilee, Judea and especially Jerusalem. It ended, as did the other three Gospels, with Jesus’ death and resurrection.

Acts continues the story. It describes the growth of the church and the spread of the gospel from Jerusalem to important cities of the Roman Empire, and then Rome itself.

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Resurrection and Ascension: What it Means to Be ‘In Christ’

"In Christ." It’s a phrase we’ve all heard. Albert Schweitzer called "being-in-Christ" the prime enigma of the apostle Paul’s teaching. Schweitzer was one of the most outstanding Germans of the 20th century—a theologian, musician and great missionary doctor, winner of the Nobel Peace prize in 1952. Schweitzer was not an orthodox Christian at the end of the day, but few people evoked the Christlike spirit more powerfully.

By: 

Neil Earle
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Ascension

Joseph Tkach

Ascension

Forty days after Jesus rose from the dead, he returned to heaven. The Ascension is so important that all the major creeds of Christian faith affirm it.

(3.4 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

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Forty days after Jesus rose from the dead, he ascended bodily into heaven. The Ascension is so important that all the major creeds of Christian faith affirm it.

Christ's bodily ascension foreshadows our own entrance into heaven with glorified bodies. 1 John 3:2 tells us: “Dear friends, now we are children of God, and what we will be has not yet been made known. But we know that when he appears, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.”

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The Ascension and the Return of Christ

In Acts 1:9, we are told: "After Jesus said this, he was taken up before their very eyes, and a cloud hid him from their sight." I would like to address a simple question: why? Why was Jesus taken up in this way? But before we get to that, let's read the next three verses:

 

By: 

Michael Morrison
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