References to: church

Upward, Inward and Outward in Words and Deeds

People sometimes use the phrase “upward, inward, and outward” to describe our Christian lives. “Upward” refers to our relationship with God. “Inward” refers to our relationship with other believers. “Outward” refers to our relationship with nonbelievers. Let’s look at some of the ways these three areas can be expressed in words and in actions.

Our upward relationship is the most important, and I will say more about it shortly. But I’d like to begin with our inward responsibilities – the relationships Christians have with one another.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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Leadership in the Church - An Examination of Eight Words

The New Testament mentions a wide variety of leaders in the church: apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, teachers, bishops, elders and deacons. What are these offices? Are they commanded for the church today? Let’s examine the evidence, starting with the titles given in Ephesians 4:11: “Christ himself gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the pastors and teachers.”

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Lay Members’ Role in the Early Church

Acts 2 describes the setting: God-fearing Jews from various nations had gathered in Jerusalem for the Day of Pentecost. The Holy Spirit filled the apostles and other disciples, and they spoke in tongues. Although the pilgrims came from 15 territories — north, south, east and west — each traveler heard his or her own native language. After Peter spoke, 3,000 baptisms took place that day (Acts 2:41). The church continued to grow rapidly (verse 47).

By: 

Donald L. Jackson
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Ministry Means Service

When the Bible talks about “ministry,” what is it talking about? When it says that Christians are to be involved in “works of ministry,” what does it mean? This article examines how the biblical writers used the words for ministry. This can help us understand a little better what we are to be doing in the church and in the world.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Leadership in the Church

Since every Christian has the Holy Spirit, and the Holy Spirit teaches each of us, is there any need for leadership within the church? Wouldn’t it be better to view ourselves as a group of equals, as every person capable of every role? Various verses in the Bible, such as 1 John 2:27, may seem to support this idea—but only if they are taken out of context. For example, when John wrote that Christians did not need anyone to teach them, did he mean they didn’t need to be taught by him? Did he say, don’t pay any attention to what I write, because you don’t need me or anyone else to teach you?

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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When We Fall Short

“Some of the pastors in my region are discouraged,” a district superintendent said. “They haven’t been able to rally their churches to a vision of reaching out to the community. Some of them have general goals, but don’t have a specific vision. Others are frustrated because the congregation isn’t supporting the vision the pastor has.”

Let me offer a few encouraging words for those who are discouraged.

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Building Unity: the Story of Euodia and Syntyche

Let me tell you about two people who worked side-by-side in the church. But something happened. They fell into a trap—a disagreement arose between them. Perhaps it began as a small argument, but it mushroomed into a rift that not only affected them but began to hurt the entire congregation.

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Responsibilities in the Christian Community to "One Another"

The Greek word allelon gives us a helpful introduction to the ways in which Christians should serve each other, because this Greek word means “one another” or “each other.” It is often used to describe our mutual obligations — the responsibility that all members have toward one another.

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Edification or Building Up Through Cell Groups

Have you ever wanted to have a Christian friend who really knew you? This friend would know and understand you at the deepest personal level. He or she would really listen to you. This friend would love you when you were unlovable. This friend could be trusted with your secrets and even your sins. He or she would extend grace to you if you shared your heart, your hopes and your faults. This friend would hold you accountable for habitually making the same mistake. He or she would tell you clearly and honestly when you were wrong or if your attitude was not the best.

By: 

Chuck Calahan
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Cell-Based Church: Community, Nurturing, Outreach

Some visionaries of church growth believe that the cell-based model of ministry is an important model of the church in the 21st century. It is a strategy of ministry that some congregations are adopting or are considering adopting. The cell-based approach is a shift in the purpose and function of a congregation. The cell church is based on members meeting in small groups and then coming together weekly to praise and worship as a congregation.

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