References to: crucifixion

Where Was Golgotha?

Where did the pivotal event of all the ages take place? 
Archaeology sheds new light on an old controversy.

The death and resurrection of Jesus Christ was the most significant event in all history! The precise location where he was crucified, buried and resurrected has intrigued Christians for many centuries. The fact of that great event does not depend on locating the authentic site. But it is only natural that Christians would have an interest in knowing where their Savior died—and where he rose again.

By: 

Keith W. Stump
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Our Strange Dead God

From the various medals, statues and drawings adorning his car, it was obvious that my taxi driver was Hindu. He was driving me to Kuala Lumpur’s airport, through the vast oil palm plantations of Southern Malaysia.

Malaysia is a multicultural nation, and although the principal religion is Islam, it is common to see Hindu and Buddhist temples alongside the mosques in the towns and villages. There is even the occasional Christian church—although Christianity is very much a minority religion in Southeast Asia.

By: 

John Halford
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Other articles by: 

Jesus Christ's Last Sermon

Jesus Christ spent his final hours of human life nailed to a cross. Despised and rejected by the world he came to save, history’s only perfect person took upon himself the consequences of our sins. The Bible records that on that spring day, from a hill outside Jerusalem, Jesus spoke several times. No one Gospel writer records all his sayings. Matthew and Mark describe one. Luke and John each give us three. Together, these sayings constitute a powerful message from our Savior’s heart during the hours of his greatest personal agony.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

A Closer Look at the Crucifixion

Today, some methods of execution, such as electrocution, are called “cruel and unusual punishment.” No execution mode ever fit that definition more than crucifixion. After the criminal was condemned by the Roman authorities to die by crucifixion, he was usually scourged with a whip. The convicted person was then compelled to carry the crossbar (when there was one) to the execution site.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

How Long Was Jesus in the Tomb?

The Gospels tell us that the day on which the women discovered that Jesus’ tomb was empty was Sunday morning. The Gospels say that the women came to the tomb “at dawn on the first day of the week” (Matthew 28:1), “very early on the first day of the week” (Mark 16:2), “on the first day of the week, very early in the morning” (Luke 24:1), or “early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark” (John 20:1). The women came to the tomb around dawn on the “first day of the week” (or Sunday), and found it empty.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Was Jesus Crucified on a Wednesday?

In Matthew 12:40, Jesus says that he will be buried “three days and three nights.” Some people teach 1) that this is not a figure of speech, 2) that Jesus therefore had to be in the tomb exactly 72 hours, 3) that since he was put in the tomb at evening, he came out at evening and 4) that this necessitates a Wednesday crucifixion. Further, this was supposedly the only sign Jesus gave that he was the Christ. Jesus had to be in the tomb exactly 72 hours or else he was not our Savior.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

A Death in Jerusalem

On a spring day in Jerusalem, a man named Jesus was tortured and executed by the Roman government. But after he died God resurrected him, and the world was forever changed.

Jerusalem seemed to be gripped by a fanatical hysteria during that fateful day on which Jesus died. Some were shouting that he had blasphemed against God and should be condemned to death. Others accused him of treason against the state, and clamored for his execution.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Christ Our Atonement

The governor found himself forced to consider the death penalty for an innocent man. Powerful political forces pressured him to make an unjust decision. But the governor knew he couldn’t live with himself if he allowed an innocent man to be executed.

The governor prided himself on his training, his knowledge of the law and his sense of justice. He had to resolve the dilemma. He did not want to order the execution of an innocent man.

By: 

G. Albrecht
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Did You Kill Jesus Christ?

Some preachers say that humanity in general and each of us personally is responsible for the death of Jesus Christ. Many sincere Christians have believed this. As a result, many labor under a huge burden of guilt. Particularly in the spring of each year, near the anniversary of his death, the burden is remembered anew.    

But are we responsible for the death of Jesus? If we aren’t, then who is?

By: 

Don Mears
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Why the Messiah Had to Die

Many first-century Jews expected a Messiah. Groaning under the oppression of occupation forces, they prayed for God to give them a leader — a leader who would defeat the Roman armies and again make the Jews a wealthy, powerful and independent nation. They wanted a Messiah who would lead them to righteousness, because God had promised to restore their fortunes when the people returned to righteousness.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Pages