References to: God

Predestination: Does God Choose Your Fate?

“I am wondering about predestination. Are some people predestined to be saved and the rest predestined not to be saved?”

The doctrine of predestination is sometimes referred to as “election,” in the sense that God chooses people for his own purposes. For example, Abraham was chosen, or elected, by God, as were his son and grandson, Isaac and Jacob. Other chosen ones included Moses, Joshua, David, the prophets, and the Israelites were the “chosen people.”

By: 

J. Michael Feazell
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Free in the Divine Freedom

"OK, I see that I can rest assured in my salvation in Christ. And I can't tell you how great it is to trust God's word and stop worrying that I'm not good enough for him to save me. Now I am wondering about predestination. What does it mean in Romans 8:29 that `those whom he foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son'? Does that mean that I will be saved no matter what because God predestined me to be saved? Are some people predestined to be saved and the rest predestined not to be saved?"

I'm glad you asked.

By: 

J. Michael Feazell
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An Introduction to God
depiction of God on Sistine Chapel
Creation of stars and planets, by Michelangelo, in the Sistine Chapel

As Christians, our most basic religious belief is that God exists.

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The Problem of Evil - a Biblical Theodicy

"If God is great and God is good,
then why would he allow evil to exist?"

Evil is a daily reality. Our suffering, as well as the suffering of others, vividly marks the presence of evil in our world. Every newspaper contains many examples of evil and its painful consequences. Entire religious systems have come from human attempts to explain evil and to give people a reason for continuing the daily struggle with evil and the pain and suffering brought about by it.

By: 

Luciano Cozzi
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God's Wrath

The Bible tells us that “God is love” (1 John 4:8). He chooses to do good, to help human beings. But the Bible also speaks of God’s wrath, his anger. How can a being of pure love also have anger?

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Does Elohim Refer to a Family of Divine Beings?

The word elohim can refer to the true God, to a false god, to angels, and to human beings. In its wide application, this name is unusual and difficult to translate into English. The ability of this word to refer correctly to God, angels, humans, and false gods can be understood only if the root of the word is kept in mind. The root means somewhat like the “powers that be,” whether they are human or divine, singular or plural.

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Is Elohim a Plural Word?

People will occasionally read statements to the effect that the Hebrew word elohim is plural, as can be seen from the ending -im. The thought behind this claim is that this plural form indicates that there is plurality in the Godhead. Some conclude that the biblical references to a Father and a Son are a biblical way of supporting the idea that God is a family of divine beings headed by the Father.

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Only One God

The Bible proclaims plainly and clearly that there is one and only one God. When the Bible says that God is one, the word one does not refer to a "God Family," but to one God. Let’s look at a few passages in the Old Testament.

By: 

Joseph Tkach, Sr.
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Does the Doctrine of the Trinity Teach Three Gods?

Some people take issue with the use of the word “Person” in the doctrine of the Trinity when the word is applied to the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. They wrongly assume that the doctrine of the Trinity inadvertently teaches that three Gods exist. Their reasoning goes something like this: If God the Father is a “Person,” then he is a God in his own right (having the characteristics of being divine). He would count as “one” God. The same could be said about the Son and Holy Spirit. Thus, there would be three separate Gods.

By: 

Paul Kroll
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One and Three

The first Christian missionaries preached the gospel in a pagan, polytheistic world. They preached that there was only one God, and they also preached Jesus Christ as God. It was not long before people wondered how these ideas could both be true.

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