References to: Gospels

Disciples Who Didn't Understand

Christianity has never been doctrinally perfect. Even the apostolic churches were not perfect. In fact, much of the New Testament was written to correct various wrong ideas. In Corinth, for example, Christians were tolerating incest, suing one another in court, eating in pagan temples and misbehaving at the Lord's Supper. Some thought they should be celibate, and some thought they should divorce their non-Christian spouses. Paul had to correct all these ideas, and history tells us that he had only limited success.

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Jesus the Messiah

Now we come to the New Testament. The title page of this section of your Bible probably includes the words of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. The New Testament is made up of 27 books, beginning with the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. These Gospels (gospel is an old English word meaning "good news") tell the story of Jesus Christ's life.

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What Do the Gospels Teach Us About Jesus?

It is difficult to summarize in two pages what the Gospels say about Jesus Christ. These four books contain more than 100 pages of information about Jesus, and so much of it seems important. Perhaps we can summarize the Gospels by looking at three questions: 1) Who is this person? 2) What did he do? 3) What does he mean for us today?

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Can We Trust the Gospels?

Are the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
historically reliable documents? Has modern New Testament
scholarship undermined the historical reliability of the Gospels?
Can the Scriptures be taken seriously as historical records?

By: 

Jim Herst
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