References to: grace

Steve McVey - The Grace Walk Revisited

Steve McVey

Steve McVey - The Grace Walk Revisited

Steve McVey discusses the themes found in his book, Grace Walk.

(28.5 minutes)
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Biography:
Steve McVey

Dr. Steve McVey is founder of GraceWalk Ministries. He is the author of Grace Walk, Grace Rules, Grace Amazing, The Godward Gaze, A Divine Invitation, Walking in the Will of God, The Grace Walk Experience, Beyond an Angry God, The Secret of Grace, Anchored and 52 Lies Heard in Church Every Sunday. For a PDF file of five YI interviews, click here.

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Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.


If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

J. Michael Feazell: Steve, it’s great to have you with us again.

Steve McVey: Thank you – glad to be here, Mike.

JMF: You wrote Grace Walk back in the 1990s.

SM: The book came out in ’95; I wrote it in ’94.

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East From West

Each spring, we celebrate the great sacrifice of Jesus Christ, by which our sins are forgiven and our eternal future is assured. It was the greatest act of love we can imagine—although we can’t fully grasp the depth of that love. As Paul wrote to the Romans, “Very rarely will anyone die for a righteous person, though for a good man someone might possibly dare to die. But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:7-8).

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The Best Story of All: The Gospel

I enjoy reading a book or watching a movie in which a good story unfolds. I especially enjoy it when I know how the story ends, yet still I am compelled to read or watch to the end to see how it unfolds. The old American television series Columbo, starring the late Peter Falk, is a great example.

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Grace From First to Last

Grace is the first word in the name of our denomination. We chose it, but not because it sounds “religious.” Each word in our name identifies our experience as a fellowship, and grace is an integral part of our identity — especially our identity in Christ. As a denomination, we have always understood grace to be God’s unconditional and unmerited pardon. But we tended to think of it as a component of salvation that needed to be “stirred into the mix” because of our inability to keep the law. We now see God’s grace as much more than that.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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God's Grace

Ask 20 ministers from multiple denominations to define grace and you’ll likely get many different definitions, along with some lively discussion! Ask several GCI ministers and you’ll likely get some variety, but there will be a common core of understanding. One thing is for sure, in GCI we’ve stopped trying to force-fit grace into a framework of legalism!

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Grace and Obedience

Even after centuries of debate, Christians still have not settled on how best to speak about the connection between faith in God’s grace and obedience. Biblically grounded Christian teachers recognize that salvation is God’s work and that it is received by faith. They also recognize that the resulting life with Christ involves obedience. The problem arises in how to affirm the one without denying (or severely qualifying) the other. The challenge is avoiding either lawlessness (antinomianism) or works-righteousness.

By: 

Gary Deddo
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No Free Lunch

Joseph Tkach

No Free Lunch

Most Christians don't believe the gospel -- they think that salvation comes only if a person deserves it through faith and a moral life.

(3.3 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

“There’s no such thing as a free lunch.” & “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” These are well-known facts of life that personal experience drills into every one of us again and again. But the Christian gospel runs counter to them. The gospel does sound too good to be true. It does offer a free lunch.

The late Trinitarian theologian Thomas Torrance put it this way:

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Grace

”If righteousness could be gained through the law,” Paul wrote, “Christ died for nothing!” (Galatians 2:21). The only alternative, he says in this same verse, is “the grace of God.” We are saved by grace, not by keeping the law.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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No Fear

No Fear

Why is it that we humans, even those of us who profess to be Christians, seem to find the idea of simple grace so impossible to believe? The prevailing view among Christians today seems to be that when all is said and done, salvation depends on what we have done or not done.

(5.1 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

God is so high you can't get over Him; So wide you can't get around Him; 

So low you can't get under Him.

Do you happen to remember this traditional Gospel song?

Little children enjoy singing along to it because they can act along with the words. They sing “So high”…and stretch their hands high above their heads; “So wide” … and they spread their arms wide; “So low”…as they crouch down as low as they can.

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Paul Molnar: The Giver and the Gift

Paul Molnar

Paul Molnar: The Giver and the Gift

When we try to separate the gift from the giver, grace separated from God, we make salvation about ourselves.

(29.5 minutes)
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Biography:
Paul Molnar

Paul Molnar is a professor of systematic theology at St. John's University in New York and a former president of the Thomas F. Torrance Theological Fellowship. For a PDF of all interviews with him, click here. He has written the following books, including:
__Thomas F. Torrance: Theologian of the Trinity
__Incarnation and Resurrection: Toward a Contemporary Understanding

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Why do you think it is important that we not separate Christ’s gifts from Christ himself?

2. Did you find the explanation of God’s “being and acts as one” satisfying? Why or why not?

3. Natural theology was described as attempting to know God without biblical faith. To what extent can this be done?

4. How do you understand the quote, “Words are subject to realities, not realities to words”?

5. It was implied that in trusting God we are obeying his law of love. Please share your thoughts about that.

6. What does the concept of God’s unconditional love mean to you?

7. Repentance was depicted not as a condition of returning to God, but as a response to his grace. How do you understand this?

8. “You can’t judge the truth of Christology by the ethical fruits of Christians.” That is, you cannot judge who Jesus is by the way Christian act. Why would people think otherwise?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Introduction: Welcome to this unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. Our guest today is Dr. Paul Molnar.

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