References to: hell

Eternal Punishment?

Joseph Tkach

Eternal Punishment?

Have you ever decided to punish a disobedient child? Did you ever declare that the punishment should last forever?

(4.2 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

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I have a couple of questions for all of us who have children. Here’s the first question: Has your child ever disobeyed you? Now, take a little time to think about it in case you’re not sure.

Okay, now if you answer was yes, like all the rest of us, here’s the second question: Have you ever punished your child for disobedience?

Finally, let me ask you this: How long did the punishment last? More to the point, Did you declare that the punishment would last forever?

The very idea of it sounds crazy, doesn’t it?

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The Great Divorce: Heaven and Hell

The Great Divorce

by C. S. Lewis

Reviewed by Terry Akers

bookThe subject of hell has intrigued the Christian church throughout its nearly 2,000-year history. This doctrine has long been a source of scholarly debate, resulting in widely varying conclusions, depending on the guiding church tradition or interpretative method used.

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Trevor Hart: Zooming in on Salvation

Trevor Hart

Trevor Hart: Zooming in on Salvation

God's heart beats with love for everyone he’s made, so he calls them into fellowship with himself. This is good news, not just for Christians but for everyone.

(27.9 minutes)
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Biography:
Trevor Hart

Trevor Hart received his PhD from the University of Aberdeen in 1989. He is Professor of Divinity at the University of St. Andrews in Edinburgh, Scotland. For a PDF of all three of our interviews with him, click here. Among his books are: 
__Faith Thinking: The Dynamics of Christian Theology (SPCK/IVP, 1995)
__Regarding Karl Barth: Toward a Reading of His Theology (Paternoster, 1999/IVP, 2000)

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Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Salvation was described as “multi-faceted.” In what ways did this discussion expand your view of the subject?

2. A “broken relationship with our maker” was presented as the real problem. Your thoughts?

3. Please comment on the “imagery of crucifixion and resurrection” regarding the Christian life.      

4. Dr. Hart, citing Karl Barth, said that God grants each of us our time. What is your reaction to that?

5. What do you think of the concept, “faith is about gratitude, not just discovering who God is”?

6. How did the claim that a fear message should be recast to one of good news impact you?

7. What do you think about the salvation of the firemen who died on 9/11?

8. Dr. Hart asserted that God made us to enjoy being in his presence. Why do some people act otherwise?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Introduction: St. Andrews, Scotland, is well known as the birthplace of golf some 600 years ago. Here also stand the 850-year-old ruins of the Cathedral of St. Andrew, three of whose 100-feet-high towers rise majestically over the east end of the city. Nearby, the esteemed University of St. Andrews, founded in 1413, is the home of St. Mary’s College, the university’s renowned divinity school, which still uses its 16th century buildings. In College Hall, a room within one of those buildings, You’re Included host J.

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The Value of Hell - by Elmer Colyer

Date: 

September 23, 2011 (All day)

Professor Elmer Colyer comments on the effects of separating the love of God from the wrath of God. 2.9 minutes.


 

To download this program in M4V format, right click here and choose "save link as."

 

For a full-length interview with Dr. Colyer, click here.

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The Value of Hell - by Elmer Colyer

Professor Elmer Colyer comments on the need to relate both heaven and hell to both the mercy and the justice of God. 0.9 minutes.


 

To download this program in M4V format, right click here and choose "save link as."

 

For a full-length interview with Dr. Colyer, click here.

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Alan Torrance: God's Wrath, Hell, and the Role of Science

Alan Torrance

Alan Torrance: God's Wrath, Hell, and the Role of Science

The wrath of God and hell come about because of God's love. Good science indicates God's existence.

(30.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Alan Torrance

Alan J. Torrance is professor of systematic theology at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. His work includes Persons in Communion: Trinitarian Description and Human Participation and The Theological Grounds for Advocating Forgiveness and Reconciliation in the Sociopolitical Realm. He earned his doctorate at theology at the University of Erlangen-Nurnberg in Germany.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Why is it important that we not separate God’s wrath from his love?

2. How do you feel about the statement, “God loves the victimizer as well as the victim?”

3. Why was it emphasized that we must not project our human concepts of wrath onto God?

4. “God’s wrath must be understood in the light of his redemptive purpose”—any thoughts?

5. How do you understand hell in the sense of “alienation from God?”

6. Please comment on, “hell is populated by people who are loved and forgiven by God.”

7. Why do you think people assume that death in this life is the cutoff point for salvation?

8. What do you think about good science being described as a “wonderful gift of God?”

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Announcer: Welcome to a special edition of You’re Included recorded in the ancient Scottish city of St. Andrews. St. Andrews is the home of the University of St. Andrews, Scotland’s oldest university, founded in 1413. St. Andrews enjoys the reputation as one of the finest institutions of higher education in the United Kingdom. It is the home of St. Mary’s College, the university’s renowned divinity school. In St. Mary’s nearly 500-year-old College Hall, You’re Included host, J.

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Elmer Colyer: Hell: The Love and Wrath of God

Dr. Elmer Colyer

Elmer Colyer: Hell: The Love and Wrath of God

Elmer Colyer discusses how hell and God's wrath are related to God's love.

(32.7 minutes)
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Biography:
Elmer Colyer

Dr. Elmer Colyer is professor of historical theology at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary, and pastor of a Methodist congregation. He is editor of The Promise of Trinitarian Theology: Theologians in Dialogue with T. F. Torrance and Evangelical Theology in Transition: Theologians in Dialogue with Donald Bloesch. He is author of How to Read T.F. Torrance: Understanding His Trinitarian and Scientific Theology and The Nature of Doctrine in T. F. Torrance’s Theology.

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Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Suggested topics:

1. Why is God’s love and mercy inseparable from his wrath and judgment?

2. Why do we tend to divide God’s traits rather than seeing them as one unified attribute?

3. Why should we see God’s character as revealed in Christ and not project our ideas onto him?

4. How does “double predestination” promote legalism and works righteousness?

5. How do you understand the statement, “God made provision for hell on the cross”?

6. Why do you think Dr. Colyer said that “hell is a better place for sinners than heaven”?

7. Why is it as wrong for Christians to see Jesus as a “political conqueror” as it was for the Jews?

8. Was the “Fatherhood of God” as revealed in the New Testament encouraging to you? How?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Elmer, thanks for being with us.

Elmer Colyer: It’s delightful to be with you again.

JMF: It’s a pleasure to have you.

Hell. We want to talk about hell today. A lot of churches will not even preach about it. In those, you never hear anybody preaching about hell. Other churches, that’s pretty much what they preach about every week. So why the divide? What does Trinitarian theology have to say about hell? And how can we understand it in terms of the grace of God and the judgment of God?

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The Battle Over Hell

It was my first visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. I was standing before The Last Judgment, a painting by the 15th-century Dutch artist Jan van Eyck.

The Last Judgment, painting by van Eyck

On the floor, directly in front of the painting, lay a sheet of paper bearing a few hastily written words. An earlier visitor had placed it there, and it had not yet been removed by museum personnel.

By: 

Keith Stump
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Sinners in the Arms of a Loving God

“The world will probably be converted into…a vast ocean of fire, in which the wicked shall be overwhelmed…their heads, their eyes, their tongues, their hands, their feet, their loins, and their vitals, shall forever be full of glowing, melting fire…they shall eternally…feel the torments…without any end at all, and never, never be delivered.”1

By: 

Paul Kroll
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