References to: Incarnation

Jesus—The Complete Salvation Package

Near the end of his Gospel, the apostle John made these intriguing comments: “Jesus performed many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in this book…. If every one of them were written down, I suppose that even the whole world would not have room for the books that would be written” (John 20:30; 21:25). Given these comments, and noting differences among the four Gospels, we conclude that these accounts were not written to be exhaustive records of Jesus’ life.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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Robert Walker: Why the Incarnation Is Good News

Robert Walker

Robert Walker: Why the Incarnation Is Good News

God the Father was in Jesus Christ, as God become human, who took our humanity into the heart of God and gave us a new humanity in the process.

(29.8 minutes)
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Biography:
Robert T. Walker

Robert T. Walker is nephew of the late Thomas F. Torrance. Walker edited Torrance's lecture notes into two books describing Torrance's teachings about the person and work of Jesus Christ. The first is Incarnation: The Person and Life of Christ (InterVarsity, 2008); the second is Atonement: The Person and Work of Christ (InterVarsity, 2009). For a PDF of all three interviews, click here.

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Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. What does the phrase “God became man” mean to you?

2. Please comment on the statement, “Jesus didn’t come to show us the way; he is the way.”

3. How does living out our “new humanity” in Christ relieve us of fear and guilt?

4. What are your thoughts on Jesus’ birth, death, resurrection, and ascension being ours as well?

5. What do you think was meant by, “We’re called to a new identity, not good behavior”?

6. It was said that the gospel is not good news if it involves making ourselves better. Why?

7. How does seeing God as a “communion of love” enhance our personal relationships?

8. Why should the gospel be presented in terms of joy and rest rather than fear and anxiety?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: What is a Christian missing out on if they don’t have an incarnational understanding of the gospel?

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What Jesus' Incarnation Shows Us About What It Means to Be a Human

“The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us” (John 1:14) is arguably the most profound and exciting statement in the Bible. Jesus came to seek and save the lost, but the good news goes much farther than that. Salvation is not merely the removal of our sins – it is a new creation, a radical transformation of what it means to be human.

You might even say that Christmas is not only about Jesus; it’s ultimately about you!

By: 

Rick Shallenberger
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Robert Walker: Christ Has Faith for Us

Robert Walker

Robert Walker: Christ Has Faith for Us

In this interview, in Scotland, Robert Walker highlights who Christ is for us. He is the editor of two of Thomas Torrance's books: Incarnation and Atonement.

(28.4 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Robert T. Walker

Robert T. Walker is nephew of the late Thomas F. Torrance. Walker edited Torrance's lecture notes into two books describing Torrance's teachings about the person and work of Jesus Christ. The first is Incarnation: The Person and Life of Christ (InterVarsity, 2008); the second is Atonement: The Person and Work of Christ (InterVarsity, 2009). For a PDF of all three interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

If you liked this interview, you might also like our interviews with Elmer Colyer, author of How to Read Thomas F. Torrance.

Introduction: You’re Included traveled to Scotland’s esteemed University of St. Andrews for a special Thomas F. Torrance conference marking the launch of the book Atonement: The Person and Work of Christ. This is the second of two volumes consisting of Torrance’s lectures on Christology at New College in Edinburgh, Scotland from 1952 to 1978. Edited by retired theology lecturer Robert T.

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He Gave Himself

God came into time and space in the Incarnation. He united himself with us, giving us the greatest gift.

“When I draw the Lord He’ll be a real big man. He has to be to explain the way things are” (A Study of Courage and Fear). A young black girl in Mississippi was describing a picture of God she had drawn at the request of psychiatrist and Harvard professor Robert Coles. Dr. Coles won the Pulitzer Prize for his Children of Crisis series.

By: 

G. Albrecht
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The Two Natures of Jesus Christ

Critics and inquirers alike often question a core tenet of Christian belief — that Jesus Christ is both fully God and fully human. Some claim Jesus was an exceptionally gifted man but not God. Others say he was God, only appearing to be human. Some insist that Jesus was a reincarnated angel. Others claim he did not become God until his resurrection.

These and other denials of Jesus' full divinity or full humanity distort the testimony of Scripture. Moreover, they deny the basis of our salvation—that God took on human flesh to come and rescue us.

By: 

Ted Johnston
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The Incarnation: The Greatest Miracle

Which is the greatest miracle of all? Many Christians would point to the resurrection of Jesus after his death on the cross. The crucifixion-resurrection event is, after all, the basis for our salvation. But why would we consider the death and resurrection of Jesus so great an event? After all, others have died and risen again. Lazarus, Jairus’ daughter, Eutychus. Why is the resurrection of Jesus a greater event than the raising of Lazarus from the dead?

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A Study of the Incarnation

Of all events in Jesus’ life, three stand out as most significant and most celebrated: his birth, death and resurrection. These are doctrinally significant. His birth illustrates his humanity; his death purchased our salvation; his resurrection illustrates his glory and guarantees our future resurrection to glory.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Who Was Jesus Before His Human Birth?

Did Jesus exist before his human birth? What or who was Jesus before his incarnation? Was he the God of the Old Testament?

In order to understand who Jesus was, we first should understand the basic doctrine of the Trinity. The Bible teaches us that God is one and only one being. This tells us that whoever or whatever Jesus was before his human incarnation, he could not have been a God separate from the Father.

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Alan Torrance: Grace Leads to Godly Living

Alan Torrance

Alan Torrance: Grace Leads to Godly Living

Dr. Torrance talks with Mike Feazell about what the Incarnation means to us and how grace leads us to godly living.

(31.3 minutes)
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Biography:
Alan Torrance

Alan J. Torrance is professor of systematic theology at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. His work includes Persons in Communion: Trinitarian Description and Human Participation and The Theological Grounds for Advocating Forgiveness and Reconciliation in the Sociopolitical Realm. He earned his doctorate at theology at the University of Erlangen-Nurnberg in Germany.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Introduction: Welcome to a special edition of You’re Included, recorded in the ancient Scottish city of St. Andrews. St. Andrews is the home of the University of St. Andrews, Scotland’s oldest university, founded in 1413. St. Andrews enjoys a reputation as one of the finest institutions of higher education in the United Kingdom. It is the home of St. Mary’s College, the university’s renowned divinity school. In St.

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