References to: Jesus

Jesus: The Unexpected Messiah

Why didn’t Jesus go down in history as a failure? In fact, why did he go down in history at all?

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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Who Jesus Really Was

The Gospel of John concentrates on Jesus’ divine identity. John says nothing specific about Jesus’ birth. His interest is to show the true identity and eternal nature of the One who became the human being, Jesus. John begins his Gospel before time began, we might say, in order to inform us about Jesus’ existence. He says: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning.”1

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N.T. Wright: How God Became King (Part 2)

N.T. Wright

N.T. Wright: How God Became King (Part 2)

Prof. N.T. Wright talks about his book, How God Became King: The Forgotten Story of the Gospels.

(15.9 minutes)
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Biography:
N.T. Wright

Nicholas Thomas (Tom) Wright was the Bishop of Durham (Church of England) 2003-2010. He is now Professor of New Testament and Early Church History at the University of St Andrews in Scotland. He is the author of more than 60 books. Among them are Justification, After You Believe, Scripture and the Authority of God, The New Testament for Everyone, Simply Jesus, How God Became King, and Paul and the Faithfulness of God.

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GD: Professor Wright, thank you for joining us again here in St. Andrews. I’d like to follow up with a few more questions that are derived mostly from your book How God Became King. I’m particularly interested in the connection and relationship between heaven and earth. Often we think of them as separate, and we’re going to heaven and leaving earth, but you want to bring out the relationship and the connection. Can you say something more about that?

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N.T. Wright: How God Became King

N.T. Wright

N.T. Wright: How God Became King

N.T. Wright talks about themes in his book, How God Became King: The Forgotten Story of the Gospels.

(30.0 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
N.T. Wright

Nicholas Thomas (Tom) Wright was the Bishop of Durham (Church of England) 2003-2010. He is now Professor of New Testament and Early Church History at the University of St Andrews in Scotland. He is the author of more than 60 books. Among them are Justification, After You Believe, Scripture and the Authority of God, The New Testament for Everyone, Simply Jesus, How God Became King, and Paul and the Faithfulness of God.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.


If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Gary Deddo: Professor Wright, thank you for taking some time out here at Saint Andrews [Scotland] this morning and joining us for the You’re Included interview series of Grace Communion International.

NTW: Good to be with you.

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The Case for Christ

The Case for Christ: A Journalist’s Personal Investigation of the Evidence for Jesus

by Lee Strobel (Zondervan, 1998)

Reviewed by Fraser Henderson

The Case for Christ is much as its title reads, though not perhaps as one might expect.

Rather than being an academic criticism of the evidence for Christ and the actions surrounding him, the author catalogues his own journey as he attempts to examine the truth behind his wife’s claims that Jesus is her personal Savior.

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Forty-Two Men and Five Women: A Study of Matthew 1:1-16

Many modern readers feel that the New Testament begins in the most boring way possible: a list of unusual and hard-to-pronounce names.

However, ancient readers would have found a number of interesting things in this list.

Women in the list

The ancestors of Jesus, the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham:

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Emmanuel, Our Redeemer

As we celebrate the birth of our Redeemer, the opening words from a beautiful hymn keep running through my mind: “There is a redeemer, Jesus God’s own Son.” Redemption isn’t a word we use often in everyday life, unless we’re talking about turning in a coupon to save money, or exchanging points for merchandise. Some of us remember saving green stamps in books and redeeming them for just about anything. We sometimes talk about redeeming time, particularly making up for a misspent youth or wasted opportunities.

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Portrait of a Woman and Jesus

cover of the bookChristian Odyssey interviews Barbara Quillen Egbert, who recently published Portrait of a Woman and Jesus.

Christian Odyssey: Why did you write Portrait of a Woman and Jesus?

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