References to: Jesus

Gordon Fee: Like Father, Like Son

Gordon Fee

Gordon Fee: Like Father, Like Son

Dr. Gordon Fee talks about the renewed image of the Father through his likeness shared in Christ the Son.

(28.3 minutes)
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Biography:
Gordon D. Fee

Dr. Gordon Fee is emeritus professor of New Testament at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. For a PDF of all three interviews, click here. Among his many publications are
     How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth (co-authored with Douglas Stuart; now in its fourth edition)
     How to Choose a Translation for All Its Worth (co-authored with Mark Strauss)

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If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Why is viewing the Father “just like Jesus Christ” so important for understanding him?

2. How does a Trinitarian concept of God help us escape false ideas regarding his nature?

3. How can taking the book of John seriously help us to know who God is and what he is like?

4. Why do “broken” human fathers often affect our view of God and his desire for a relationship?

5. Please share your thoughts on our being Christ’s “image bearers” by loving our enemies.

6. Why is it usually better to “love our neighbors as they are” rather than try to “convert” them?

7. Dr. Fee said, “True evangelism has to stem out of good relationships.” Please comment. 

8. The distinction was made between “doing good” and “doing works.” Your thoughts?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Welcome to You’re Included, the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. With us today is author and New Testament scholar Dr. Gordon Fee. Dr. Fee is Professor Emeritus of Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. He’s considered a leading expert in the field of biblical interpretation and is author of many books, including How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth and How to Read the Bible Book by Book, both of which he co-authored with Douglas Stuart.

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Playing Jesus—a Discussion with Bruce Marchiano

In his Epistle to the Romans, Paul reminds us to “clothe yourselves with the Lord Jesus Christ” (Romans 13:1). The Greek word is enduo, meaning “to put on as a garment,” or as an actor will put on a costume. Few people have had the opportunity to do this as literally as Bruce Marchiano, who played the lead role in a dramatization of the Gospel of Matthew.

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Jesus Walks on the Water

Dan Rogers

Jesus Walks on the Water

In a house church format, Dan Rogers discusses the significance of Jesus walking on the Sea of Galilee.

(35.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Dan Rogers

Dan Rogers earned his PhD in historical theology from Union Institute and University. He is now retired, after serving many years as the Director of Church Administration & Development in Grace Communion International.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

Dan Rogers: Good morning, everyone. We’ve had a nice service so far, and it’s now time for the section where we talk about God’s word – take a look at it, and see not only what it said, but what it’s saying to us today.

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Eternally God's Son?

One of the most natural mistakes commonly made with regard to God’s nature is in the assertion that the Logos became God’s Son at the time of his human birth. This is a natural mistake because human beings find it easy to grant a state of affairs that they can explain from experience. In the context of human experience, nothing is more understandable than sonship through physical birth.

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The Hero Who Wouldn’t

At several times in Jesus’ ministry, he attracted crowds of people who wanted to make him king, but he refused. He sent them away, or he slipped away, because if thousands of people started to proclaim him king, there would be a confrontation with the Romans and the Jewish leaders, and it was not yet time for that. But eventually the time came.

It was less than one week before his crucifixion, on what is now called Palm Sunday. Jesus told two of his disciples where they would find a donkey, and what they were to do with it.

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The Heart of the Matter - Jesus

Teaching section

Jesus was fully human

Born in a humble family, attested by secular sources, he shared a human body (he was tired, hungry, thirsty— John 4:6; Matthew 4:2; John 19:5). He shared human experiences (he grew up in a big family, worked for a living and knew the force of temptation — Matthew 12:46; Mark 6:3; Matthew 4:1-11; Hebrews 4:15).

Jesus was more than human

Jews were the last people in the world, with their strict monotheism, to allow that any human being could be one with God. Yet many were convinced. Why?

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I Want to Accept Jesus, But...

Advice for young people thinking about
committing their lives to Jesus Christ.

“I want to accept Jesus, but I’m afraid. I’m not even sure if I’m ready yet, but I want to be.” My wife and I were talking with a teenage girl. She said she wanted to accept Jesus but didn’t understand how. “Can you describe what happens when I decide to commit my life to Christ? What is expected of me as a Christian? How will I have to change?”

By: 

Rick Shallenberger
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What Jesus Said About Himself

Jesus preached the kingdom of God. However, the early church preached mostly about Jesus. Is there a contradiction in this? Did the early church get things turned around, preaching about the messenger but neglecting his message? Let’s go to the four Gospels to see whether the early church’s focus on Jesus is compatible with Jesus’ own teaching. Did Jesus actually preach about himself?

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Worthy Is the Lamb

One of the most paradoxical parts of Revelation is John's vision of the lion followed immediately by a slain lamb. As the vision opens in Revelation 5:1-5, John is told that the Lion of the tribe of Judah has prevailed to open the scroll sealed with seven seals. But as John looks for a lion, he sees a lamb instead (verse 6). It is a grisly sight, for the lamb appears to have been slaughtered. This is the first occurrence of lamb imagery in Revelation. It's as though the image has been kept for its dramatic entrance precisely until this point. 

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A Mystery Revealed

"In reading this ... you will be able to understand my insight into the mystery of Christ, which was not made known to men in other generations as it has now been revealed by the Spirit to God's holy apostles and prophets" (Ephesians 3:4-5).

By: 

Don Mears
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