References to: Lord's supper

George Hunsinger: The Eucharist and Ecumenism

George Hunsinger

George Hunsinger: The Eucharist and Ecumenism

Dr. George Hunsinger talks about his work; examining the theology of the Eucharist across different Christian heritages.

(44.9 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
George Hunsinger

George Hunsinger is a Presbyterian minister and professor of systematic theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, NJ. For a PDF with all four of his interviews, click here. His published works include
___The Eucharist and Ecumenism: Let Us Keep the Feast (Cambridge, 2008)

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. How do you personally understand the “real presence of Christ” in the Lord’s Supper?

2. Please share your thoughts on Jesus Christ retaining his “full humanity” after his ascension.

3. Why were the terms “participation” and “relational” used to describe the bread and the wine?

4. Dr. Hunsinger spoke of the incarnation as a “mystery.” Why don’t we fully understand it?

5. What do you think of the “iron in the fire” (abiding distinction/inseparable unity) analogy?

6. Does the concept of “transelementation” make sense to you? Please share your thoughts.

7. “Christ is present in the communion despite our faith traditions.” What does this mean to you?

8. How did the interview impress on you the need to engage on historically divisive issues?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Introduction: You’re Included is the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of a Christ-centered Trinitarian theology. Today’s guest is Dr. George Hunsinger, Princeton Theological Seminary’s Hazel Thompson McCord Professor of Systematic Theology. Dr. Hunsinger is an ordained Presbyterian minister and a major contributor to the latest Presbyterian Catechism.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other programs in this series: 

Other articles about this topic: 

George Hunsinger: Focus on Christ

George Hunsinger

George Hunsinger: Focus on Christ

Dr. George Hunsinger talks about the importance of keeping the focus on Christ and the relational nature of the eucharist; how it can serve to break down denominational barriers.

(35.0 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
George Hunsinger

George Hunsinger is a Presbyterian minister and professor of systematic theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, NJ. For a PDF with all four of his interviews, click here. His published works include
___The Eucharist and Ecumenism: Let Us Keep the Feast (Cambridge, 2008)

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. How can the “order of salvation” become a distraction to keeping our focus on Christ?

2. It was emphasized that the Eucharist should not be denied to “outside” believers. Why?

3. Please share your thoughts on “ecumenism” and church unity in general.

4. In what ways did the church “pie chart” change your perception of organized Christianity?

5. Do you view the fragmentation of the Protestant church in a positive or a negative way? Why?

6. “Reconciled” and “acceptable” diversity were mentioned regarding church unity. What do you think of this?

7. How do you understand the concept, “priesthood of all believers”?

8. Do you think the “Eucharistic unity” of the church can ever be achieved? Why or why not?

A few guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Introduction: You’re Included is the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of a Christ-centered Trinitarian theology. Today’s guest is Dr. George Hunsinger, Princeton Theological Seminary’s Hazel Thompson McCord Professor of Systematic Theology. Dr. Hunsinger is an ordained Presbyterian minister and a major contributor to the latest Presbyterian Catechism.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other programs in this series: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Partaking of the Promises

"The Lord Jesus, on the night he was betrayed, took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, ‘This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me.’ In the same way, after supper he took the cup, saying, ‘This cup is the new covenant in my blood; do this, whenever you drink it, in remembrance of me.’ For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes" (1 Corinthians 11:23-26).

Wine and bread

By: 

Joseph Tkach
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Other articles by: 

The Name of the Lord's Supper

Passover, Communion, Lord’s Supper, Eucharist: All are traditional names for the observance commemorating Jesus’ death. Should we use any (or all) of these to describe our service?

In 1845, in Philadelphia, J.L. Boyd and C.S. Minor led a small sabbatarian church to observe an annual “Passover” with bread and grape juice in commemoration of Jesus’ death. “They also washed one another’s feet, following Jesus’ Passover example. They continued this practice alone for 30 years before they ever found any others who agreed with them.”1

By: 

Ralph Orr
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

The Lord's Supper Reminds Us of God's Love

As often as we observe the Lord’s Supper, we should let it remind us afresh of God’s love for us, a love that will never fail, a love that will never get smaller. Though humans may be unfaithful, God will never leave us or forsake us. Though we may struggle and stumble many times, God never abandons us. He is always ready to welcome us back.

As we commemorate Jesus’ death, we are gloriously confident of God’s love for us. We do not need to worry that our sins, no matter how many or how serious, have cut us off from him. God always welcomes his children.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Other articles by: 

Celebrating the Lord's Supper at Home

The Lord's Supper is a memorial of our Savior's death by which he atoned for all our sins. Those who have accepted Jesus Christ as their personal Savior participate in this service. Church members usually participate in the Lord's Supper service with their congregation. When this is not possible, it may be observed privately or in small groups.

Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

How Often Should We Participate in the Lord's Supper?

Shortly before his death, Jesus shared a meal with his disciples. He shared a cup of wine with them, and then some bread. “He took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, ‘This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me’” (Luke 22:19).

When Jesus told his disciples to do “this” in remembrance of him, what were they to “do”? They were to take bread, give thanks, break it and share it. They were also to share some wine (verse 17; 1 Corinthians 11:25).

By: 

Joseph Tkach
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Other articles by: 

Is Eating the Lamb of God Only an Annual Event?

“Look,” said John the Baptist, “the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29).

When you think of Jesus as the Lamb of God, which lamb do you identify him with? Perhaps 1 Corinthians 5:7 pops into your mind: “For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed.” Jesus is our Passover Lamb. Based on that understanding, some people keep the Lord’s Supper as an annual event.

By: 

Don Mears
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

The Bread of Heaven

Jesus said to them, “I tell you the truth, it is not Moses who has given you the bread from heaven, but it is my Father who gives you the true bread from heaven. For the bread of God is he who comes down from heaven and gives life to the world…. This is the bread that came down from heaven. Your forefathers ate manna and died, but he who feeds on this bread will live forever” (John 6:32-33, 58)

By: 

Don Mears
Related Articles & Content: 

Other articles about this topic: 

Pages