References to: salvation

What Are You Worth?

Joseph Tkach

What Are You Worth?

Many people think they have to be good enough to save. They think God doesn’t want them unless they can measure up. But Jesus said otherwise. God wants us.

(3.7 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

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If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

Two years ago, a lock of Elvis Presley’s hair that had been preserved by a fan was sold at auction for fifteen thousand dollars. And last year, someone paid more than $20,000 for a set of Winston Churchill’s false teeth. And Emperor Napoleon’s toothbrush sold for $21,000.

You and I are not so famous, and no one would pay anything like that for something that belonged to us. But have you ever asked yourself, “What exactly am I worth?”

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Trevor Hart: Zooming in on Salvation

Trevor Hart

Trevor Hart: Zooming in on Salvation

God's heart beats with love for everyone he’s made, so he calls them into fellowship with himself. This is good news, not just for Christians but for everyone.

(27.9 minutes)
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Biography:
Trevor Hart

Trevor Hart received his PhD from the University of Aberdeen in 1989. He is Professor of Divinity at the University of St. Andrews in Edinburgh, Scotland. For a PDF of all three of our interviews with him, click here. Among his books are: 
__Faith Thinking: The Dynamics of Christian Theology (SPCK/IVP, 1995)
__Regarding Karl Barth: Toward a Reading of His Theology (Paternoster, 1999/IVP, 2000)

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Salvation was described as “multi-faceted.” In what ways did this discussion expand your view of the subject?

2. A “broken relationship with our maker” was presented as the real problem. Your thoughts?

3. Please comment on the “imagery of crucifixion and resurrection” regarding the Christian life.      

4. Dr. Hart, citing Karl Barth, said that God grants each of us our time. What is your reaction to that?

5. What do you think of the concept, “faith is about gratitude, not just discovering who God is”?

6. How did the claim that a fear message should be recast to one of good news impact you?

7. What do you think about the salvation of the firemen who died on 9/11?

8. Dr. Hart asserted that God made us to enjoy being in his presence. Why do some people act otherwise?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Introduction: St. Andrews, Scotland, is well known as the birthplace of golf some 600 years ago. Here also stand the 850-year-old ruins of the Cathedral of St. Andrew, three of whose 100-feet-high towers rise majestically over the east end of the city. Nearby, the esteemed University of St. Andrews, founded in 1413, is the home of St. Mary’s College, the university’s renowned divinity school, which still uses its 16th century buildings. In College Hall, a room within one of those buildings, You’re Included host J.

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When Were You Saved?

Dr. Joseph Tkach

When Were You Saved?

Our salvation was secured by Jesus long before we made any decision. Our faith doesn’t save us, or cause God to change his mind about us.

(3.4 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

.

Before Christ was crucified, Peter was with him, eating, living, and interacting with him for at least three years. Yet, when crunch time came, Peter vigorously denied his Lord three times. Along with all the other disciples, he fled into the night, leaving Jesus to face crucifixion alone.

Three days later, the risen Christ appeared to these very disciples; those who had denied him and run away. Several days later he appeared to Peter, James, and John while they were casting nets from their fishing boat, inviting them to breakfast on the shore.

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What Is Salvation?

Salvation is a rescue operation. To understand salvation, we need to know what the problem was, what God did about it, and how we respond to it.

When God made humans, he made them "in his own image" (Genesis 1:26-27). We are in some way like God himself. That’s because God has something special in mind for us.

But as we all know, humans can be rather ungodly as well. Humans are noble and crude at the same time. We can have high ideals, and yet be barbaric.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Douglas Campbell: Sin and Its Seriousness

Douglas Campbell

Douglas Campbell: Sin and Its Seriousness

Dr. Campbell encourages us to look at the gospel of grace in a new way. He speaks about how the gospel addresses and informs our understanding of sin and ethics in a way that challenges the model of a conditional or contractual grace.

(28.8 minutes)
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Biography:
Douglas Campbell

Dr. Douglas Campbell is Associate Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School in Durham, North Carolina. He is the author of The Quest for Paul's Gospel and The Deliverance of God: An Apocalyptic Rereading of Justification in Paul. For a PDF of all four interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

 

Suggested topics:

1. In reference to the gospel, why is it inappropriate to say, “Grace, but…”?

2. Why do people worry about sin, justice, and judgment when Christ made provision for them?

3. What do you think accounts for our “conditional mentality” mentioned by Dr. Campbell?

4. It was said that true liberty and real freedom involve “freedom of response.” Please comment.

5. What do you think of the concept, “We have to resonate with what God is doing in our lives”?

6. Give us your thoughts on the statement, “We are released from sin as well as forgiven of sin.”

7. Why is it critical to realize that it is Christ’s faith imparted to us and not our faith in him?

8. How do you view Jesus Christ as being “our perfect response to God for us”?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Introduction: Grace Communion International presents You’re Included, the good news of Jesus Christ. Our host is Dr. J. Michael Feazell. Welcome to this unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. Our guest today is Douglas A. Campbell, Associate Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School. Dr. Campbell is author of The Deliverance of God and The Quest for Paul’s Gospel.

J. Michael Feazell: Thanks for being with us.

Douglas Campbell: You’re welcome.

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Douglas Campbell: Our Participation With Christ

Dr. Douglas Campbell

Douglas Campbell: Our Participation With Christ

This interview gets to the heart and core of Paul's gospel. It includes our Reality with a capital "R" plus our participation with Christ and with each other in communion with God.

(30.0 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Douglas Campbell

Dr. Douglas Campbell is Associate Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School in Durham, North Carolina. He is the author of The Quest for Paul's Gospel and The Deliverance of God: An Apocalyptic Rereading of Justification in Paul. For a PDF of all four interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Group Study Guide (also available in pdf format)

Paul’s gospel focuses on “participation.” We have nothing to offer God, but in Christ, God gives us everything. His gifts enable us to participate with Christ through the Holy Spirit in Christ’s own communion with the Father, and therefore with fellow human beings.

Discussion

1. In what ways has the “the end” already come to us through Christ’s resurrection?

2. What is the “New Reality” that Dr. Campbell spoke of?

3. How has Christ taken our sin, depression, dislocation and death onto himself?

4. What does it mean to be “resurrected with Christ”?

5. How has God “come the whole way to you”?

6. How have you participated with Christ by “entering into his suffering”?

7. How do we participate in Christ with God and one another and the world?

8. How does humanity share in the eternal communion of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit?

9. What is the “essential reality” of our relationship with God and with one another?

10. What are some implications of the gospel’s emphasis on relationships being made right in Christ, as opposed the common idea of us trying to find righteousness through keeping the law?

11. What lessons can we learn about suffering and sharing from Paul and Onesimus from the book of Philemon?

12. What scriptural references during the interview had the most impact on you?

13. What, for you, was the most meaningful part of Dr. Campbell’s interview?

Introduction: Welcome to this unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. Our guest today is Douglas Campbell, Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School. Dr. Campbell is author of The Deliverance of God and The Quest for Paul’s Gospel.

J. Michael Feazell: Thanks for being with us.

Douglas Campbell: You’re welcome.

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What Is Salvation?

"Why am I alive?" "Does my life have any purpose?" "What will happen to me after I die?" You’ve probably asked these questions. Everyone needs to know that life has meaning and that there is life after death.

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Standing in Christ Alone

"OK, I can see that we're saved by grace and not by works, but I'm still not clear on a couple of things. For example, some passages in the New Testament indicate that we won't be saved unless we are doing good works. How do those passages fit with the passages that tell us we are saved by grace and not by works?"

Good question.

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The Joy of Salvation

Have you ever noticed that we tend to appreciate things more after they are gone? People take better care of their heart, for example, after it stops working for a minute. The job that causes complaints one week may be valued more after the job comes to an end.

An old car looks good to someone who has none, but less desirable to someone who has a new one. It’s the same car, yet one person appreciates it more than the other one does, because the person who has less tends to value it more.

By: 

Joseph Tkach
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Is Jesus the Only Way of Salvation?

People sometimes object to the Christian belief that salvation is given only through Jesus Christ. In our pluralistic society, tolerance is expected, even demanded, and the concept of freedom of religion (which permits all religions) is sometimes misinterpreted to mean that all religions are somehow equally true.

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