References to: youth ministry

Andrew Root: Entering into the Full Humanity of Adolescence

Andrew Root

Andrew Root: Entering into the Full Humanity of Adolescence

Dr. Andrew Root talks about relational Youth Ministry arising out of place sharing rather than patterns of influence.

(28.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Andrew Root

Dr. Andrew Root, Assistant Professor of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, received his doctorate from Princeton Theological Seminary. He is author of Revisiting Relational Youth Ministry: From a Strategy of Influence to a Theology of Incarnation. For a PDF file of all four interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Group study guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. What does the term “relational youth ministry” mean to you?

2. Cite practical ways we can correspond to the “reality” and “full humanity” of adolescents.

3. How can we use the “secret” of the empty tomb to encourage the alienated and despondent?

4. Young people demand that we “call a thing what it is.” Why is this so hard to do?

5. How does the fear of not being in control, of not showing any vulnerability, hurt relationships?

6. Dr. Root said, “You can’t get a relationship through judgment.” What are your views on this?

7. How can “sharing our yearning and brokenness” with youth lead to deeper relationships?

8. How can a congregation become more “incarnational” or fully relational toward its youth?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Thanks for joining us on another edition of You’re Included, the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. With us today is Dr. Andrew Root, Assistant Professor of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. His new book is Relationships Unfiltered.

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Andrew Root: God Turns Death Into Life

Dr. Andrew Root

Andrew Root: God Turns Death Into Life

We do not need to be afraid of doubt. When we fear that "God is not here," that is when God is likely to be found.

(33.5 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Andrew Root

Dr. Andrew Root, Assistant Professor of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, received his doctorate from Princeton Theological Seminary. He is author of Revisiting Relational Youth Ministry: From a Strategy of Influence to a Theology of Incarnation. For a PDF file of all four interviews, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Why do you think Dr. Root uses the terms “relational” and “incarnational” interchangeably?

2. Why is ministry more relevant if it comes from the heart through our own broken experience?

3. What makes today’s youth so sensitive to a “façade of righteousness”?

4. Why is contemplating our broken humanity more useful than moralism and legalism?

5. How can teaching “life and death” be more effective than focusing on “right and wrong”?

6. Do you agree that divorce can affect a child’s sense of personal identity? Why?

7. How have you personally experienced God’s presence in moments of despair and loneliness?

8. How can building a conversation around our doubts and fears, as suggested, benefit us?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

J. Michael Feazell: Welcome to another edition of You’re Included, the unique interview series devoted to practical implications of Trinitarian theology. Today we’re talking with Andrew Root, Assistant Professor of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota.

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Confessions of a Youth Evangelist

It was the right idea, but the focus was wrong.

I worked for more than a decade with an organization that focused on sharing the good news about Jesus with teenagers. It was a privilege to work with people who face up to the challenge of engaging teens in the ever-changing youth culture. I think we did some good work. But later I wondered if I need to look at my approach toward sharing Jesus with young people—or any age group, for that matter.

By: 

Greg Williams
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Youth Ministry Values and Mission

In youth ministry, we need to ask three key questions:

  1. Why youth ministry? (What are our core values?)
  2. What should youth ministry be? (What is our mission?)
  3. How should youth ministry be conducted? (What is our strategy?)

We believe that youth ministry should be grounded on the following core values and directed toward the following mission.

Youth ministry core values

We begin with some essential beliefs about God, God’s will and the church’s appropriate response:

By: 

Ted Johnston
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Youth Ministry: The Emphasis Must Be Spiritual

For a good deal of my 25-plus years in youth ministry, I held to a mistaken philosophy. I believed that if you bring young people (children, adolescents, young adults) into an environment where good people with good thoughts, good motives and good activities existed, good things would happen. Although good things often did happen, an entire arena of spiritual focus and value was missed.

By: 

Jeb Egbert
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Youth Ministry Includes Developing Young Leaders

For any ministry to have lasting impact, new leaders must be identified, trained and mobilized.

During his earthly ministry, Jesus was active in making disciples. That work included seeking the lost, nurturing believers and equipping workers. But Jesus did not stop there—he placed high priority on another essential aspect of disciplemaking: multiplying and sending leaders. Jesus’ apprentice leaders, led and empowered by the Holy Spirit, gave birth to the disciplemaking movement we know as the Christian church.

By: 

Jeb Egbert
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How to Make Your Congregation Youth-Friendly

All Christians share in the challenge and responsibility of making our congregations places where people of all ages are encouraged and enabled to become increasingly mature disciples of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. That mission involves helping others meet Christ, know Christ and serve with Christ.

By: 

Ted Johnston
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Equipping Our Youths for Peer Evangelism

Our goal in youth ministry is to help children, teens and college-age young adults become active followers of Jesus. A follower of Jesus is one who is in communion with God, through Christ. In that relationship, Jesus gives them the Holy Spirit, through whom they share in Jesus’ love for God and for people, and they are equipped and empowered to actively participate with Jesus in his ministry patterns.

By: 

Ted Johnston
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Disciplemaking Youth Ministry Includes Equipping Workers

In our youth ministry articles, we are focusing on following the disciplemaking ministry patterns that Jesus modeled and then commanded his disciples: “Go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20).

By: 

Jeb Egbert
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Nurturing Young Believers

The great joy of those who minister to children, teens and college-age young adults is seeing them in fellowship with God and with the community of Christ’s body, the church (1 John 1:3-4).

This fellowship is theirs through Jesus Christ, manifested in the love God extends to them through caring peers and adult mentors and teachers who reach out to young people in Jesus’ name. These adults include the parents and youth ministry leaders and workers who are so important to the birth and development of young followers of Jesus.

By: 

Ted Johnston
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