References to: Bible

Yellow Pages and the Bible

Joseph Tkach

Yellow Pages and the Bible

The Bible is known as the “good book,” but many people don’t seem to know what it’s good for. Some people think it's good for everything, for every question.

(3.3 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

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Click here for articles about the Bible.

I think everyone watching knows what this is. 

The Yellow Pages have been a familiar feature of homes and businesses for well over a hundred years. Even in this age of online directories, you have probably got one of these around somewhere.

We all know how to use them. They provide an alphabetical listing of businesses and services. So, if I want to find a plumber, someone to fix my computer, or make a reservation at a certain kind of restaurant, all I have to do is look in my Yellow pages.

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Boxes

Joseph Tkach

Boxes

Some children would rather play with the box than the toy inside it. Some Christians focus more on the Bible than the message it contains.

(2.8 minutes)
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Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

When our son was little, my wife and I bought him a little wagon to haul around his other toys. He sat patiently while I opened the box, pulled out the wagon, popped on the wheels and tongue, and smiled expectantly at him. He smiled back, then crawled straight into the box, started rolling around in it and proceeded to play with the box the rest of the day.

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General Articles About the Bible

We provide articles on the history of the Bible and how to understand it.

  • A Guided Tour of the Bible. Most Americans have a Bible, but many have never read it. Perhaps they started to read it, but gave up after reading a few chapters.
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Elmer Colyer: Theology and the Bible

Elmer Colyer

Elmer Colyer: Theology and the Bible

Rev. Dr. Elmer Colyer explores the Bible and how the church has wrestled with how theology has shaped our interpretations.

(33.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Elmer Colyer

Dr. Elmer Colyer is professor of historical theology at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary, and pastor of a Methodist congregation. He is editor of The Promise of Trinitarian Theology: Theologians in Dialogue with T. F. Torrance and Evangelical Theology in Transition: Theologians in Dialogue with Donald Bloesch. He is author of How to Read T.F. Torrance: Understanding His Trinitarian and Scientific Theology and The Nature of Doctrine in T. F. Torrance’s Theology.

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Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

Small group discussion guide

Discussion groups might wish to prepare their own topics, request topics from the group, use the following suggested topics, or mix and match all three.

Suggested topics:

1. Please share your thoughts on the “hermeneutical circle” or the relationship between theology and Scripture.

2. The historical/critical approach to Scripture was described as useful but inadequate. Why?

3. In what ways do you think the Enlightenment has influenced Christianity?

4. What is your personal view of the ecumenical movement?

5. It was asserted that in every field everyone brings their presuppositions. Your thoughts?

6. A community with ultimate beliefs was emphasized. Why do you think this is important?

7. Dr. Colyer said we need a perspective to be able to rightly see reality. Please comment on this.

8. How did the Magic Eye analogy of the Bible (integration of form and knowing) impact you?

A few simple guidelines for leading a discussion: 1) Encourage open discussion. 2) Ask questions relevant to the topic. 3) Listen attentively. 4) Encourage divergent views. 5) Encourage everyone to participate. 6) Summarize and paraphrase. 7) Minimize teaching and preaching.

Introduction: Grace Communion International presents You’re Included, the good news of Jesus Christ. Our host is Dr. Michael Morrison. You’re Included is a unique interview series devoted to practical implications of a Christ-centered Trinitarian theology. Today’s guest is Reverend Dr. Elmer Colyer. Dr. Colyer is Professor of Historical Theology at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary and an ordained United Methodist pastor and elder. Dr.

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The Purpose and Authority of the Bible

God is not primarily concerned with whether we understand astrophysics, botany, and chronology. We go wrong if we try to use his inspired book for purposes it was not designed for. The primary purpose of the Bible is its message about salvation, and that is its primary sphere of authority. It is a sufficient guide that tells us how we might be given eternal life with God.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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Anniversary of the King James Bible

Joseph Tkach

Anniversary of the King James Bible

The King James Version gave a centrality and a commonality to English-speaking Protestant Christianity that endured until very recent times.

(3.7 minutes)
Program download options:
Biography:
Joseph Tkach

Joseph Tkach has been president of Grace Communion International since 1995. He holds a Doctor of Ministry degree from Azusa Pacific University. For more information about him, click here.

Learn More:

Perhaps you know of someone who might like to watch this program. If so, go to the bottom of the page and click on "Email this page." Fill out the short form, and share the good news! There's also a way to share the page on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other websites.

If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

See our articles about the Bible at www.gci.org/bible

The year 2011 marks the 400th anniversary of the first printing of the King James Version of the Bible. England’s King James I commissioned nearly 50 scholars and translators to revise an already existing text – the Bishop’s Bible of 1568. In their words, they set out not to make a new translation of the Bible, but “to make a good one better, or out of many good ones, one principal good one.” This included gleaning the best from such well-known versions as Tyndale’s, Matthew’s, Coverdale’s and the Geneva Bible.

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Digging Up the Bible

egyptianEgyptian tomb painting from Beni-Hasan (about 1900 B.C.) shows how Abraham’s family might have dressed.

By: 

Keith Stump
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William Tyndale and the Birth of the English Bible

On October 6, 1536, Englishman William Tyndale (c.1494-1536) was strangled by the civil executioner in Belgium and his dead body was burned at the stake. His crime? Tyndale had translated the New Testament and major portions of the Old Testament from the original languages into English so that English-speaking Christians could read the Scriptures in their own tongue.

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What the Gospels Teach Us About the Scriptures

The Scriptures were an important part of Jesus’ work. He used the Old Testament as an authoritative basis for beliefs and behavior. He used the Hebrew Bible to prove his points, to explain his mission and ministry, and to communicate God’s will for his people.

Jesus and the Pharisees agreed that God had inspired the Scriptures. Jesus disagreed with them about interpretations, but they all agreed on the basic belief that these writings were true and authoritative.

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