References to: Bible

Literal and Figurative

How to understand the language of the Bible.

breadJesus took bread and said, "Take and eat; this is my body" (Matthew 26:26). Did Jesus Christ intend for this statement to be taken literally, or was he using symbolic language, a figure of speech? Christianity has been divided on that question for centuries.

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Comforted by the Word

It is amazing how often we read in the Bible this exhortation from God: "Don't be afraid. Don't be terrified!"

It seems that again and again we need to hear these words from the Lord: "Do not be afraid. I am with you!" The Bible is plain that we are called to follow the Lord God without fear.

But who lives fearlessly? We all find ourselves afraid at times as we are confronted with life's tragedies, traumas and crises. Reading the Bible, which assures us of God's never-failing presence in our lives, helps us through these times.

By: 

John McKenna, PhD
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Timeless Truths in Cultural Clothes

The Authority of the New Testament Writings

Most Christians accept the Bible as authoritative, as a book that gives reliable spiritual guidance. If we took a survey of Christians, asking them, “Do you believe the Bible?,” most of them would say, “Yes” — or at least they would try to say yes to some portion of the Bible, such as the New Testament, or the teachings about loving one another. They want to say in some sense that they believe the Bible, that they accept it as an authority in their faith.

By: 

Michael Morrison
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The Bible: Truth or Fiction?

writingIs the Bible the truth of God or merely composed of human ideas?

In January 1989, John Shelby Spong, the Episcopal bishop of Newark, New Jersey, raised some disturbing questions about the Bible’s truthfulness. He disputed it during a televised debate with fundamentalist minister Jerry Falwell. Millions of Americans were watching the network news show as they ate breakfast.

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Treasure in the Trash

Pile of trash; iStockPhotoThe American children’s television series Sesame Street, well known for its “Muppets” characters, premiered on November 10, 1969, and it became one of the longest-running children’s programs on television.

By: 

Kerry Gubb
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The Written Word of God

How do we know who Jesus is, or what he taught? How do we know when a teaching is false? Where is the authority for sound doctrine and right living? The Bible is the inspired and infallible record of what God wants us to know and do.

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The Divine Drama

Mike Morrison

The Divine Drama

The biblical story can be summarized as a great drama, a story about what God is doing in our lives.

(29.0 minutes)
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Biography:
Michael Morrison

Michael Morrison has a PhD from Fuller Theological Seminary. He is Dean of Faculty and Instructor in New Testament for Grace Communion Seminary. He is the author of Sabbath, Circumcision and Tithing and Who Needs a New Covenant? The Rhetorical Function of the Covenant Motif in the Argument of Hebrews.

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A PDF version of this message is available here.

Do you know what is God doing in your life? And what is he doing in the world as a whole? These two questions are of course interrelated: What God is doing in your life, has something to do with what he is doing in the world as a whole.

But just what is that? What’s he up to?

We wouldn’t know much about God at all, except for what the Bible tells us. In order for us to see what God is doing, he has to reveal himself to us, and he does that in the Bible.

So what is he up to?

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Gordon Fee: The Book of Revelation

Gordon Fee

Gordon Fee: The Book of Revelation

Dr. Fee talks with Mike Feazell about the book of Revelation and basic principles of understanding Scripture.

(32.3 minutes)
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Biography:
Gordon D. Fee

Dr. Gordon Fee is emeritus professor of New Testament at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. For a PDF of all three interviews, click here. Among his many publications are
     How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth (co-authored with Douglas Stuart; now in its fourth edition)
     How to Choose a Translation for All Its Worth (co-authored with Mark Strauss)

Learn More:

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If you'd like to support this ministry, click here.

If you are interested in learning more about Trinitarian theology, check out Grace Communion Seminary. It's accredited, affordable, and 100 percent online.

JMF: Thank you for joining us on You’re Included. Christians the world over look to the Bible as their guide to faith and practice. Yet from the inception of the church, there has been much disagreement over how to interpret what the Scriptures say. Our guest today has done much work in helping Christians with basic principles of rightly understanding the Bible.

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